reserves


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to reserves: Military reserves, Bank reserves

re·serve

 (rĭ-zûrv′)
tr.v. re·served, re·serv·ing, re·serves
1. To keep back, as for future use or for a special purpose: The hospital reserves certain drugs for the most serious cases.
2. To set or cause to be set apart for a particular person or use: reserved a seat on the next flight out. See Synonyms at book1.
3. To keep or secure for oneself; retain: I reserve the right to disagree. See Synonyms at keep.
n.
1.
a. Something kept back or saved for future use or a special purpose: a runner with a reserve of energy for the final lap.
b. An amount of capital that is not invested or otherwise used in order to meet probable demands, such as withdrawals by bank depositors or claims on insurance policies.
2.
a. Lack of enthusiasm, as from a misgiving or doubt: supported the idea without reserve.
b. Self-restraint in expression or bearing; reticence or coolness: maintained a dignified reserve throughout the ceremony.
3. A reservation of public land: a forest reserve.
4. An amount of a mineral, fossil fuel, or other resource known to exist in a particular location and to be exploitable: the discovery of large oil reserves.
5.
a. A fighting force kept uncommitted until strategic need arises.
b. The part of a country's armed forces not on active duty but subject to call in an emergency.
c. A member of either of these forces: the army's active reserves.
6. Sports
a. A group of players that play only as substitutes for starters in games or are kept from playing for some reason.
b. One of these players.
adj.
Held in or forming a reserve: a reserve supply of food.
Idiom:
in reserve
Kept back, set aside, or saved.

[Middle English reserven, from Old French reserver, from Latin reservāre, to keep back : re-, re- + servāre, to keep; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

re·serv′a·ble adj.
re·serv′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular armyreserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular army
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
SA, Storm Troops, Sturmabteilung - Nazi militia created by Hitler in 1921 that helped him to power but was eclipsed by the SS after 1943
trainband - a company of militia in England or America from the 16th century to the 18th century
territorial reserve, territorial - a territorial military unit
militiaman - a member of the militia; serves only during emergencies
References in classic literature ?
Then, after another embrace, the incident and our interview closed on my recognition of all the reserves of goodness that, for his joke, he had been able to draw upon.
He has to be prompt--for these two-o'clock-in-the-morning fights, if they once get out of hand, are like a forest fire, and may mean the whole reserves at the station.
In most schools children are perfectly at liberty to learn their lessons or not, just as they please; but the principal reserves an equal liberty to whip them if they cannot repeat their tasks.
In time of actual warfare they form a part of the reserves, and when the necessity arises fight with even greater intelligence and ferocity than the men.
A shell screaming like a storm banshee went over the huddled heads of the reserves.
Humanity has got beyond that stage, and reserves such a form of life for the people whom, in a very arbitrary manner, it chooses to call criminals.
They will be repaid you by the Lord God, who, I hope, reserves trials and troubles for me alone.
2) The Convention of London expressly reserves to every nation the right of waging war so long as it does not interfere with the traffic and all that implies.
Blessingbourne did feel, it then appeared, the force of the fellow, but she had her reserves and reactions, in which Voyt was much interested.
I am not the kind of criminal that `reserves his defence,' but the better kind that reserves his last bullet.
I should have got a lawyer, and he would have said (as I have often read in the newspapers), 'My client says nothing, my client reserves his defence': my client this, that, and t'other.
Inch by inch, fighting with splendid gallantry, the attacking force was pressed back down the hillside, till at last it retreated upon its reserves in something like confusion.