resilience


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Related to resilience: proof resilience

re·sil·ience

 (rĭ-zĭl′yəns)
n.
1. The ability to recover quickly from illness, change, or misfortune; buoyancy.
2. The property of a material that enables it to resume its original shape or position after being bent, stretched, or compressed; elasticity.

resilience

(rɪˈzɪlɪəns)
n
1. Also: resiliency the state or quality of being resilient
2. (Environmental Science) ecology the ability of an ecosystem to return to its original state after being disturbed
3. (General Physics) physics the amount of potential energy stored in an elastic material when deformed

re•sil•ience

(rɪˈzɪl yəns)

also re•sil′ien•cy,



n.
1. the power or ability to return to the original form, position, etc., after being bent, compressed, or stretched; elasticity.
2. ability to recover readily from illness, depression, adversity, or the like; buoyancy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.resilience - the physical property of a material that can return to its original shape or position after deformation that does not exceed its elastic limit
elasticity, snap - the tendency of a body to return to its original shape after it has been stretched or compressed; "the waistband had lost its snap"
2.resilience - an occurrence of rebounding or springing back
backlash, rebound, recoil, repercussion - a movement back from an impact

resilience

noun
1. suppleness, give, spring, flexibility, elasticity, plasticity, pliability, springiness the texture of the skin and the resilience of the flesh
2. strength, toughness, adaptability, hardiness the resilience of human beings

resilience

noun
1. The ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement:
Translations

resilience

[rɪˈzɪlɪəns] N (Tech) → elasticidad f (fig) → resistencia f

resilience

[rɪˈzɪliəns] n
[material] → résistance f
[person] (mental)ténacité f, résistance f; (physical)résistance f
[market, economy, currency] → résistance f

resilience

n
(of material)Federn nt
(fig, of person, nature) → Unverwüstlichkeit f; (of economy)Stabilität f

resilience

[rɪˈzɪlɪəns] n (see adj) → elasticità, capacità di ripresa

re·sil·i·ence

1. n. capacidad de lograr una recuperacíon después de una enfermedad;
2. elasticidad. V.: elasticity
References in classic literature ?
At last he arose in a weary manner, as though all the resilience had gone out of his body, and proceeded to fasten the dogs to the sled.
All grace, and resilience, and power resided therein.
It is really wonderful how much resilience there is in human nature.
The sunlight had faded from her hair; the once firm white neck was beginning to lose its resilience.
MIT professor Lawrence Vale poses this question to the multitude of practitioners and workers of resilience in his book 'The Resilient City'.
By setting up a Flood Resilience Alliance Zurich Insurance hence started helping communities better cope with flood risks via research, community-based programs and risk expertise.
London: First MicroFinance Bank (FMFB) of Tajikistan joined the EBRD's Climate Resilience Financing Facility (CLIMADAPT).
When Ambassador Laura R Dogu arrived in Managua in 2015, she made establishing a resilience committee one of her top priorities.
This volume considers resilience in the tourism industry from individual, organizational, and destination perspectives.
of understanding (MoU) with Care International, Pakistan, on 'Gender in Emergencies and Building Resilience in Pakistan'.
While the purpose of this article is not to discuss True Grit, the movie, we do need to address the issue of true grit in the workplace, otherwise known as resilience.
Email and data security firm Mimecast recently published an e-book that explored cyber resilience planning and discovered a severe lack of awareness and adoption by organisations across the world.