bacteria

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bac·te·ri·a

 (băk-tîr′ē-ə)
n.
Plural of bacterium.

bacteria

(bækˈtɪərɪə)
pl n, sing -rium (-rɪəm)
(Microbiology) a very large group of microorganisms comprising one of the three domains of living organisms. They are prokaryotic, unicellular, and either free-living in soil or water or parasites of plants or animals. See also prokaryote
[C19: plural of New Latin bacterium, from Greek baktērion, literally: a little stick, from baktron rod, staff]
bacˈterial adj
bacˈterially adv

bac•te•ri•a

(bækˈtɪər i ə)

n.pl., sing. -te•ri•um (-ˈtɪər i əm)
any of numerous groups of microscopic one-celled organisms constituting the phylum Schizomycota, of the kingdom Monera, various species of which are involved in infectious diseases, nitrogen fixation, fermentation, or putrefaction.
[1905–10; < New Latin < Greek baktḗria, pl. of baktḗrion; see bacterium]
bac•te′ri•al, adj.
bac•te′ri•al•ly, adv.

Bacteria


the branch of biology that studies and classifies bacteria. — bacteriologist, n.bacteriologic, bacteriological, adj.
a strong resistance by bacteria to absorbing stains. — chromatophobic, adj.
a bacterium that grows well in the presence of hemoglobin. — hemophilic, adj.
the branch of biology that studies microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and pathogenic protozoa. — microbiologist, n.
an abnormal fear of microorganisms. — microphobic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacteria - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fissionbacteria - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
immune reaction, immune response, immunologic response - a bodily defense reaction that recognizes an invading substance (an antigen: such as a virus or fungus or bacteria or transplanted organ) and produces antibodies specific against that antigen
bioremediation - the act of treating waste or pollutants by the use of microorganisms (as bacteria) that can break down the undesirable substances
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
acidophil, acidophile - an organism that thrives in a relatively acid environment
probiotic, probiotic bacterium, probiotic flora, probiotic microflora - a beneficial bacterium found in the intestinal tract of healthy mammals; often considered to be a plant
bacteroid - a rodlike bacterium (especially any of the rod-shaped or branched bacteria in the root nodules of nitrogen-fixing plants)
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
Calymmatobacterium, genus Calymmatobacterium - a genus of bacterial rods containing only the one species that causes granuloma inguinale
Francisella, genus Francisella - a genus of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria that occur as pathogens and parasite in many animals (including humans)
gonococcus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae - the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrhea
legionella, Legionella pneumophilia - the motile aerobic rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that thrives in central heating and air conditioning systems and can cause Legionnaires' disease
nitrobacterium - any of the bacteria in the soil that take part in the nitrogen cycle; they oxidize ammonium compounds into nitrites or oxidize nitrites into nitrates
penicillin-resistant bacteria - bacteria that are unaffected by penicillin
pus-forming bacteria - bacteria that produce pus
rod - any rod-shaped bacterium
diplococcus - Gram-positive bacteria usually occurring in pairs
superbug - a strain of bacteria that is resistant to all antibiotics
resistance - the degree of unresponsiveness of a disease-causing microorganism to antibiotics or other drugs (as in penicillin-resistant bacteria)
microphage - a neutrophil that ingests small things (as bacteria)
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans

bacteria

plural noun microorganisms, viruses, bugs (slang), germs, microbes, pathogens, bacilli Chlorine is added to kill bacteria.
Translations
بَكْتِيريابَكْتيريا، جَراثيمجراثيم
bakterie
bakteriebakterier
bakteeritbakteerikanta
bakterije
baktériumok
bacterios
bakteri
bakteríurgerlargerlar, bakteríur
バクテリア細菌
박테리아세균
bakterijabakteriologasbakteriologijabakteriologinis
baktērija
bakteriabakterie
bactériabactérias
baktérie
bakterije
bakteriebakterier
เชื้อแบคทีเรีย
bakteribakteriler
vi khuẩn

bacteria

[bækˈtɪərɪə] NPLbacterias fpl

bacteria

[bækˈtɪəriə] nplbactéries fpl

bacteria

[bækˈtɪərɪə] nplbatteri mpl

bacteria

(bakˈtiəriə) singular bacˈterium (-əm) noun plural
organisms not able to be seen except under a microscope, found in rotting matter, in air, in soil and in living bodies, some being the germs of disease. a throat infection caused by bacteria.
bacˌteriˈology (-ˈolədʒi) noun
the study of bacteria.
bacˌterioˈlogical (ˈlo-) adjective
bacˌteriˈologist noun

bacteria

بَكْتِيريا bakterie bakterie Bakterien βακτήρια bacteria, bacterias bakteerit bactérie bakterije batteri バクテリア 박테리아 bacteriën bakterier bakteria bactéria бактерия bakterie เชื้อแบคทีเรีย bakteri vi khuẩn 细菌

bac·te·ri·a

n.,pl. bacterias, gérmenes; organismos microscópicos.

bacteria

pl de bacterium
References in periodicals archive ?
CARB-X, which stands for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator, currently funds projects in 6 countries and is working to expand its pipeline with the best science from around the world.
Given the alarming rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria and the length of time it takes to develop a new antibiotic, we need to look at any solution that could fix the antibiotic drug discovery pipeline now," researcher Matt Cooper said in the university statement.
The findings meant scientists are one-step closer to finding a way of developing drugs to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria.
4m Funding to VenatoRx Pharmaceuticals for Development of Antibiotics to Combat Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria
This research funding was awarded by the Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator (CARB-X), an international, public-private partnership focused on the discovery and development of new antimicrobial products to address the threat of antibiotic resistance.
Across the region, multi-drug resistant bacteria are an increasing concern.
The spread of resistant bacteria in hospitals or community healthcare settings is a major issue for patient safety and this is why: Infections with antibiotic-|resistant bacteria increase levels of disease and death, as well as the length of time people stay in hospitals; Inappropriate use of |antibiotics may increasingly cause patients to become colonised or infected with resistant bacteria, and Few new antibiotics are |being developed.
CDC will leverage its expertise and build on core strengths to address the threat of antibiotic resistance to slow the development of resistant bacteria and prevent the spread of resistant infections by 1) strengthening national surveillance efforts to track resistant bacteria, 2) advancing development and use of rapid and innovative diagnostic tests for identification and characterization of resistant bacteria, and 3) improving international collaboration and capacities for antibiotic resistance prevention, surveillance, control, and antibiotic research and development.
The executive order also establishes a new national task force charged with combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, orders a number of agencies to propose new regulations, and calls for improved surveillance to track resistant bacteria across sectors, among other measures.
It was not until World War II that penicillin was developed for commercial use, and at that time Fleming warned that improper use would lead to resistant bacteria.
KARACHI -- The World Health Organization (WHO) has asked the countries to implement infection control measures and counter antimicrobial resistant bacteria.
Professor Tim Walsh, of Cardiff University's School of Medicine, who led the research in Delhi, said resistant bacteria was found in public water used for drinking, washing and food preparation and also in pools and rivulets in heavily-populated areas where children play.