resocialize

resocialize

(riːˈsəʊʃəˌlaɪz) or

resocialise

vb (tr)
to retrain (a person) psychologically so that he or she conforms again to society's norms and values, or adapts to a different environment (for example to normal society after a prolonged term in prison)
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References in periodicals archive ?
should be to resocialize the offender"--a goal written into the institutional apparatus of indeterminate sentencing and parole.
Instead, as inoculations do not instantly end the debilitating effects of plagues, and institutional release does not instantly resocialize ex-prisoners back into the communities from which they have been isolated, so the cure in Christ has not instantly ended all of the effects of individual constraints and structural sin.
The modal was adapted by Uganda government in order to educate and resocialize children who are living on the streets.
We note that restrictions on liberty to which these adolescents are submitted to, in a comparative analysis as to what has been put forward by Baratta, does not reeducate, resocialize nor re-integrate.
It is People's Consultative Assembly (MPR) who continuously resocialize the four pillars of the nation which include: Pancasila, the 1945 Constitution, Unity in Diversity and the Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia (NKRI).
After the end of the works, the time required for people to resocialize, interact, and become (un)familiar with the new spatial configurations often takes years.
In March 2010, the National Council for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, with the President at the helm, was established to treat, rehabilitate, resocialize, and reduce the number of drug addicts.
The purpose of the catechetical process was profound: "to re-form pagan people, to resocialize them, to deconstruct their old world, and reconstruct a new one, so they would emerge as Christian people who would be at home in communities of freedom.
The gang has constituted a secondary "fringe" organization to resocialize members of the group to internalize and adhere to alternative norms and modes of behavior.
If ratified, the treaty would give these organizations a license to sue, reeducate, and resocialize their fellow citizens.
As stated by Dutton and Painter (1993), the current predominant paradigm of treatment is to separate the spouses; remove the woman from the abusive union and empower her through therapy, education, and advocacy; and legally punish the abusers and resocialize them through psychoeducational groups.
How does pre-emigration socialization associated with a politically divided homeland affect the political attitudes and behavior of immigrants from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong as they learn to resocialize or adapt to a new political system in the United States?