resolved


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re·solve

 (rĭ-zŏlv′)
v. re·solved, re·solv·ing, re·solves
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a firm decision about: resolved that I would do better next time. See Synonyms at decide.
b. To decide or express by formal vote: The legislature resolved that the official should be impeached.
c. To cause (a person) to reach a decision: "He was resolved to enjoy the success he had earned" (F. Scott Fitzgerald).
2. To change or convert: My resentment resolved itself into resignation.
3. To find a solution to; solve: resolved the problem.
4. To remove or dispel (doubts).
5. To bring to a usually successful conclusion: resolve a conflict.
6. Medicine To cause reduction of (an inflammation, for example).
7. Music To cause (a tone or chord) to progress from dissonance to consonance.
8. Chemistry To separate (an optically inactive compound or mixture) into its optically active constituents.
9. To render parts of (an image) visible and distinct.
10. Mathematics To separate (a vector, for example) into coordinate components.
11. Archaic To separate (something) into constituent parts.
12. Obsolete To cause (something) to melt or dissolve: "O, that this too too solid flesh would melt / Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!" (Shakespeare).
v.intr.
1. To reach a decision or make a determination: resolve on a course of action.
2. To become separated or reduced to constituents.
3. Music To undergo resolution.
n.
1. Firmness of purpose; resolution: "my fierce, indignant resolve to visit those sun-kissed islands" (Caitlin Flanagan).
2. A determination or decision; a fixed purpose: "She had come to a resolve to undertake outdoor work in her native village" (Thomas Hardy).
3. A formal resolution made by a deliberative body.

[Middle English resolven, to dissolve, from Old French resolver, from Latin resolvere, to untie : re-, re- + solvere, to untie; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

re·solv′a·bil′i·ty, re·solv′a·ble·ness n.
re·solv′a·ble adj.
re·solv′ed·ly (-zŏl′vĭd-lē) adv.
re·solv′er n.

resolved

(rɪˈzɒlvd)
adj
fixed in purpose or intention; determined
resolvedly adv
reˈsolvedness n

re•solved

(rɪˈzɒlvd)

adj.
firm in purpose or intent; determined.
[1490–1500]
re•solv′ed•ly, adv.
re•solv′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.resolved - determined; "she was firmly resolved to be a doctor"; "single-minded in his determination to stop smoking"
resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"
2.resolved - explained or answered; "mysteries solved and unsolved; problems resolved and unresolved"

resolved

adjective determined, intent, set on, bent on, resolute, persistent He was resolved to stay till the end.
Translations
مُصَمِّم، عازِم
rozhodný
fast besluttet
ákveîinn

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] ADJ to be resolved to do sthestar resuelto a hacer algo

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] adj (= determined) → résolu(e)
to be resolved to do sth → être résolu(e) à faire qch

resolved

adj(fest) entschlossen

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] adjrisoluto/a

resolution

(rezəˈluːʃən) noun
1. a firm decision (to do something). He made a resolution to get up early.
2. an opinion or decision formally expressed by a group of people, eg at a public meeting. The meeting passed a resolution in favour of allowing women to join the society.
3. resoluteness.
4. the act of resolving (a problem etc).
ˈresolute (-luːt) adjective
doing what one has decided to do, in spite of opposition, criticism etc. a resolute attitude.
ˈresolutely adverb
ˈresoluteness noun
resolve (rəˈzolv) verb
1. to make a firm decision (to do something). I've resolved to stop smoking.
2. to pass (a resolution). It was resolved that women should be allowed to join the society.
3. to take away (a doubt, fear etc) or produce an answer to (a problem, difficulty etc).
noun
1. determination to do what one has decided to do. He showed great resolve.
2. a firm decision. It is his resolve to become a director of this firm.
resolved (rəˈzolvd) adjective
determined. I am resolved to go and nothing will stop me.
References in classic literature ?
But not to crowd this part with an account of the lesser part of the rogueries with which they plagued them continually, night and day, it forced the two men to such a desperation that they resolved to fight them all three, the first time they had a fair opportunity.
Pox o' your sorrow," says Western; "it will do me abundance of good when I have lost my only child, my poor Sophy, that was the joy of my heart, and all the hope and comfort of my age; but I am resolved I will turn her out o' doors; she shall beg, and starve, and rot in the streets.
If we all resolved not to do the things we never do we'd all be on the Roll of Honour.
But first they resolved to sell the goods the ship, and then go to Madagascar for recruits, several among them having died since my confinement.
Once, when in a room with a lamp dimly lit before the icon Theodosia was talking of her life, the thought that Theodosia alone had found the true path of life suddenly came to Princess Mary with such force that she resolved to become a pilgrim herself.
Overwhelmed at first under this violent shock, he by and by recovered himself, and resolved to crush the proposal by weight of his arguments.
He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should NOW escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the last day must have material weight in confirming or crushing it.
I first got acquainted with the master of a ship who had been on the coast of Guinea; and who, having had very good success there, was resolved to go again.
At last I resolved on a desperate course, and told my mother my resolution, viz.
She had long resolved that oneandtwenty should be the period.
Notwithstanding these inconveniences we were pleased with the present tranquillity we enjoyed, and lived contentedly on lentils and a little corn that we had; and I, after we had sold all our goods, resolved to turn physician, and was soon able to support myself by my practice.
Chief among those who did this fetching and carrying was Captain Bildad's sister, a lean old lady of a most determined and indefatigable spirit, but withal very kindhearted, who seemed resolved that, if she could help it, nothing should be found wanting in the Pequod, after once fairly getting to sea.