resolved


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re·solve

 (rĭ-zŏlv′)
v. re·solved, re·solv·ing, re·solves
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a firm decision about: resolved that I would do better next time. See Synonyms at decide.
b. To decide or express by formal vote: The legislature resolved that the official should be impeached.
c. To cause (a person) to reach a decision: "He was resolved to enjoy the success he had earned" (F. Scott Fitzgerald).
2. To change or convert: My resentment resolved itself into resignation.
3. To find a solution to; solve: resolved the problem.
4. To remove or dispel (doubts).
5. To bring to a usually successful conclusion: resolve a conflict.
6. Medicine To cause reduction of (an inflammation, for example).
7. Music To cause (a tone or chord) to progress from dissonance to consonance.
8. Chemistry To separate (an optically inactive compound or mixture) into its optically active constituents.
9. To render parts of (an image) visible and distinct.
10. Mathematics To separate (a vector, for example) into coordinate components.
11. Archaic To separate (something) into constituent parts.
12. Obsolete To cause (something) to melt or dissolve: "O, that this too too solid flesh would melt / Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!" (Shakespeare).
v.intr.
1. To reach a decision or make a determination: resolve on a course of action.
2. To become separated or reduced to constituents.
3. Music To undergo resolution.
n.
1. Firmness of purpose; resolution: "my fierce, indignant resolve to visit those sun-kissed islands" (Caitlin Flanagan).
2. A determination or decision; a fixed purpose: "She had come to a resolve to undertake outdoor work in her native village" (Thomas Hardy).
3. A formal resolution made by a deliberative body.

[Middle English resolven, to dissolve, from Old French resolver, from Latin resolvere, to untie : re-, re- + solvere, to untie; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

re·solv′a·bil′i·ty, re·solv′a·ble·ness n.
re·solv′a·ble adj.
re·solv′ed·ly (-zŏl′vĭd-lē) adv.
re·solv′er n.

resolved

(rɪˈzɒlvd)
adj
fixed in purpose or intention; determined
resolvedly adv
reˈsolvedness n

re•solved

(rɪˈzɒlvd)

adj.
firm in purpose or intent; determined.
[1490–1500]
re•solv′ed•ly, adv.
re•solv′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.resolved - determined; "she was firmly resolved to be a doctor"; "single-minded in his determination to stop smoking"
resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"
2.resolved - explained or answered; "mysteries solved and unsolved; problems resolved and unresolved"

resolved

adjective determined, intent, set on, bent on, resolute, persistent He was resolved to stay till the end.
Translations
مُصَمِّم، عازِم
rozhodný
fast besluttet
ákveîinn

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] ADJ to be resolved to do sthestar resuelto a hacer algo

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] adj (= determined) → résolu(e)
to be resolved to do sth → être résolu(e) à faire qch

resolved

adj(fest) entschlossen

resolved

[rɪˈzɒlvd] adjrisoluto/a

resolution

(rezəˈluːʃən) noun
1. a firm decision (to do something). He made a resolution to get up early.
2. an opinion or decision formally expressed by a group of people, eg at a public meeting. The meeting passed a resolution in favour of allowing women to join the society.
3. resoluteness.
4. the act of resolving (a problem etc).
ˈresolute (-luːt) adjective
doing what one has decided to do, in spite of opposition, criticism etc. a resolute attitude.
ˈresolutely adverb
ˈresoluteness noun
resolve (rəˈzolv) verb
1. to make a firm decision (to do something). I've resolved to stop smoking.
2. to pass (a resolution). It was resolved that women should be allowed to join the society.
3. to take away (a doubt, fear etc) or produce an answer to (a problem, difficulty etc).
noun
1. determination to do what one has decided to do. He showed great resolve.
2. a firm decision. It is his resolve to become a director of this firm.
resolved (rəˈzolvd) adjective
determined. I am resolved to go and nothing will stop me.
References in classic literature ?
Beth said nothing, but wiped away her tears with the blue army sock and began to knit with all her might, losing no time in doing the duty that lay nearest her, while she resolved in her quiet little soul to be all that Father hoped to find her when the year brought round the happy coming home.
She had resolved never to take another step backward.
Hepzibah, nevertheless, stood at a gaze, with her hands clasped, looking very much as if she had summoned up an evil spirit, and were afraid, yet resolved, to hazard the encounter.
Under the appellation of Roger Chillingworth, the reader will remember, was hidden another name, which its former wearer had resolved should never more be spoken.
Supper over, the company went back to the bar-room, when, knowing not what else to do with myself, I resolved to spend the rest of the evening as a looker on.
When Brahma, or the God of Gods, saith the Shaster, resolved to recreate the world after one of its periodical dissolutions, he gave birth to Vishnoo, to preside over the work; but the Vedas, or mystical books, whose perusal would seem to have been indispensable to Vishnoo before beginning the creation, and which therefore must have contained something in the shape of practical hints to young architects, these Vedas were lying at the bottom of the waters; so Vishnoo became incarnate in a whale, and sounding down in him to the uttermost depths, rescued the sacred volumes.
But he was resolved that she should never find this out, and so was always on the watch to see that he did not betray any of his ugly self; he would take care even in little matters, such as his manners, and his habit of swearing when things went wrong.
The house now resolved itself into a committee of the whole, to consider the accommodations and arrangements for the meeting.
She had long resolved that oneandtwenty should be the period.
But first they resolved to sell the goods the ship, and then go to Madagascar for recruits, several among them having died since my confinement.
Notwithstanding these inconveniences we were pleased with the present tranquillity we enjoyed, and lived contentedly on lentils and a little corn that we had; and I, after we had sold all our goods, resolved to turn physician, and was soon able to support myself by my practice.
He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration should NOW escape him, nothing that could elevate her with the hope of influencing his felicity; sensible that if such an idea had been suggested, his behaviour during the last day must have material weight in confirming or crushing it.