respects


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Related to respects: pay respects, in some respects, in all respects, in many respects

re·spect

 (rĭ-spĕkt′)
n.
1. A feeling of appreciative, often deferential regard; esteem: I have great respect for your work. See Synonyms at regard.
2. The state of being regarded with honor or esteem: a leader held in the greatest respect.
3.
a. Consideration or appreciation: Can't you at least give me some respect?
b. Due regard for something considered important or authoritative: respect for the law.
4. A particular aspect, feature, or detail: In many respects this is an important decision.
5. Usage Problem Relation; reference. See Usage Note at regard.
tr.v. re·spect·ed, re·spect·ing, re·spects
1. To feel or show deferential regard for; esteem or admire: All the other scholars respect her.
2.
a. To avoid interfering with or intruding upon: Please respect my privacy.
b. To avoid violating: I respected the speed limit throughout the trip.
3. To relate or refer to; concern: As respects the rights of land owners, this law says nothing.
Idioms:
in respect of Chiefly British
With respect to.
pay (one's) respects
1. To express polite respect, as by paying a visit or addressing one's host: "He paid his respects to the newly-weds, clapping the groom on the shoulder and saying something that made him laugh" (Clare Clark).
2. To express mournful respect for the dead, as by attending a wake or delivering a eulogy: "Six Capuchin monks, sitting by the coffin, took turns reciting the prayers for the dead as dignitaries filed by to pay their respects" (David I. Kertzer).
with/in respect to
In reference or relation to; concerning: "The Supreme Court ... permits greater restriction of commercial speech under current case law than it does with respect to other types of speech" (Samuel A. Alito, Jr.).

[From Middle English, regard, from Old French, from Latin respectus, action of looking back at, regard, from past participle of respicere, to look back at, regard : re-, re- + specere, to look at; see spek- in Indo-European roots.]

re·spect′er n.

respects

(rɪˈspɛkts)
pl n
formal an expression of esteem or regard (esp in the phrase pay one's respects)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.respects - (often used with `pay') a formal expression of esteemrespects - (often used with `pay') a formal expression of esteem; "he paid his respects to the mayor"
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
Translations
إحْتِرامات، تَحِيّات
uctivé pozdravy
hilsen
kveîja
úctivé pozdravy
hürmetlersaygılar

respect

(rəˈspekt) noun
1. admiration; good opinion. He is held in great respect by everyone; He has no respect for politicians.
2. consideration; thoughtfulness; willingness to obey etc. He shows no respect for his parents.
3. a particular detail, feature etc. These two poems are similar in some respects.
verb
1. to show or feel admiration for. I respect you for what you did.
2. to show consideration for, a willingness to obey etc. One should respect other people's feelings/property.
reˈspectable adjective
1. having a good reputation or character. a respectable family.
2. correct; acceptable. respectable behaviour.
3. (of clothes) good enough or suitable to wear. You can't go out in those torn trousers – they're not respectable.
4. large, good etc enough; fairly large, good etc. Four goals is a respectable score.
reˈspectably adverb
reˌspectaˈbility noun
reˈspectful adjective
having or showing respect.
reˈspectfully adverb
reˈspectfulness noun
reˈspecting preposition
about; concerning. Respecting your salary, we shall come to a decision later.
reˈspective (-tiv) adjective
belonging to etc each person or thing mentioned. Peter and George went to their respective homes.
reˈspectively (-tiv-) adverb
referring to each person or thing mentioned, in the order in which they are mentioned. Peter, James and John were first, second and third, respectively.
reˈspects noun plural
greetings. He sends his respects to you.
pay one's respects (to someone)
to visit (a person) as a sign of respect to him.
with respect to
about; concerning. With respect to your request, we regret that we are unable to assist you in this matter.
References in classic literature ?
But it was a fair enough piece of work, and in many respects satisfying.
Whatever may be the truth, as respects the root and the genius of the Indian tongues, it is quite certain they are now so distinct in their words as to possess most of the disadvantages of strange languages; hence much of the embarrassment that has arisen in learning their histories, and most of the uncertainty which exists in their traditions.
Indeed, it is to be feared that some of the more rustic and bashful youths of Devil's Ford, who had felt it incumbent upon them to pay their respects to the new-comers, were more at ease in this vestibule than in the arcana beyond, whose glories they could see through the open door.
They are such, in all respects, as it behooves your nearest kinsman to make.
But, as respects the majority of my corps of veterans, there will be no wrong done if I characterize them generally as a set of wearisome old souls, who had gathered nothing worth preservation from their varied experience of life.
I now demand of you to speak out and tell me who and what this harpooneer is, and whether I shall be in all respects safe to spend the night with him.
For some reason, the Jungfrau seemed quite eager to pay her respects.
Sam's palm-leaf had been ingeniously disentangled from all pretensions to braid, as respects its brim; and the slivers starting apart, and standing upright, gave it a blazing air of freedom and defiance, quite equal to that of any Fejee chief; while the whole brim of Andy's being departed bodily, he rapped the crown on his head with a dexterous thump, and looked about well pleased, as if to say, "Who says I haven't got a hat?
A man may grow rich in Turkey even, if he will be in all respects a good subject of the Turkish government.
I think that the farmer displaces the Indian even because he redeems the meadow, and so makes himself stronger and in some respects more natural.
When we escaped from that slavery at twelve years of age, we were in some respects men.
He'll mebbe look for us there, and you must just go and represent the family, an' give him our respects.