respiration


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Related to respiration: respiratory system, aerobic respiration, cellular respiration, Plant respiration, respiration rate, Human Respiration

res·pi·ra·tion

 (rĕs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The action or process of inhaling and exhaling; breathing. Also called ventilation.
b. An act of inhaling and exhaling; a breath.
2. The action or process by which an organism without lungs, such as a fish or plant, exchanges gases with its environment.
3.
a. The oxidative process occurring within living cells by which the chemical energy of organic molecules is converted in a series of metabolic steps into usable energy in the form of ATP, involving the consumption of oxygen and the production of carbon dioxide and water as byproducts.
b. Any of various analogous metabolic processes by which certain organisms, such as anaerobic bacteria and some fungi, obtain energy from organic molecules without consuming oxygen.

res′pi·ra′tion·al adj.

respiration

(ˌrɛspəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. (Biology) the process in living organisms of taking in oxygen from the surroundings and giving out carbon dioxide (external respiration). In terrestrial animals this is effected by breathing air
2. (Biology) the chemical breakdown of complex organic substances, such as carbohydrates and fats, that takes place in the cells and tissues of animals and plants, during which energy is released and carbon dioxide produced (internal respiration)

res•pi•ra•tion

(ˌrɛs pəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of respiring; inhalation and exhalation of air; breathing.
2.
a. the sum total of the physical and chemical processes by which oxygen is conveyed to tissues and cells and the oxidation products, carbon dioxide and water, are given off.
b. the oxidation of organic compounds occurring within cells and producing energy for cellular processes.
res`pi•ra′tion•al, adj.

res·pi·ra·tion

(rĕs′pə-rā′shən)
The process by which organisms exchange gases, especially oxygen and carbon dioxide, with the environment. In air-breathing vertebrates, respiration takes place in the lungs. In fish and many invertebrates, respiration takes place through the gills. Respiration in green plants occurs during photosynthesis. See cellular respiration.

respiration

1. Chemical reactions inside a cell that break down food molecules to release energy.
2. A term with several different meanings: (1) breathing; (2) taking up oxygen and giving out carbon dioxide; (3) deriving energy from food with or without oxygen. See aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.respiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic moleculesrespiration - the metabolic processes whereby certain organisms obtain energy from organic molecules; processes that take place in the cells and tissues during which energy is released and carbon dioxide is produced and absorbed by the blood to be transported to the lungs
metabolic process, metabolism - the organic processes (in a cell or organism) that are necessary for life
2.respiration - a single complete act of breathing in and out; "thirty respirations per minute"
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"
3.respiration - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalationrespiration - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
artificial respiration - an emergency procedure whereby breathing is maintained artificially
abdominal breathing - breathing in which most of the respiratory effort is done by the abdominal muscles; "abdominal breathing is practiced by singers"
eupnea, eupnoea - normal relaxed breathing
hyperpnea - energetic (deep and rapid) respiration that occurs normally after exercise or abnormally with fever or various disorders
hypopnea - slow or shallow breathing
hyperventilation - an increased depth and rate of breathing greater than demanded by the body needs; can cause dizziness and tingling of the fingers and toes and chest pain if continued
panting, heaving - breathing heavily (as after exertion)
Cheyne-Stokes respiration, periodic breathing - abnormal respiration in which periods of shallow and deep breathing alternate
smoking, smoke - the act of smoking tobacco or other substances; "he went outside for a smoke"; "smoking stinks"
breathing out, exhalation, expiration - the act of expelling air from the lungs
snoring, stertor, snore - the act of snoring or producing a snoring sound
sniffle, snuffle, snivel - the act of breathing heavily through the nose (as when the nose is congested)
wheeze - breathing with a husky or whistling sound
second wind - the return of relatively easy breathing after initial exhaustion during continuous exertion
breathing in, inhalation, intake, aspiration, inspiration - the act of inhaling; the drawing in of air (or other gases) as in breathing
bodily function, bodily process, body process, activity - an organic process that takes place in the body; "respiratory activity"

respiration

noun
The act or process of breathing:
Translations
تَنَفُّس
dechdýchání
ånding
hengitys
lélegzés
öndun
andningrespiration

respiration

[ˌrespɪˈreɪʃən] Nrespiración f

respiration

[ˌrɛspɪˈreɪʃən] nrespiration f

respiration

n (Bot, Med) → Atmung f

respiration

[ˌrɛspɪˈreɪʃn] nrespirazione f

respire

(rəˈspaiə) verb
to breathe.
respiration (respəˈreiʃən) noun
breathing.
respirator (ˈrespə) noun
1. a sort of mask worn to purify the air breathed in eg by firemen.
2. a piece of apparatus used to help very ill or injured people to breathe.
respiratory (ˈrespərətəri) adjective
related to breathing. respiratory diseases.

res·pi·ra·tion

n. respiración, proceso respiratorio;
abdominal ______ abdominal;
aerobic ______ aeróbica;
accelerated ______ acelerada;
anaerobic ______ anaeróbica;
diaphragmatic ______ diafragmática;
air hunger, gasping ______ jadeante;
labored ______ laboriosa.

respiration

n respiración f
References in classic literature ?
But soon, her senses being very acute, she became conscious of an irregular respiration in an obscure corner of the room.
But the bird has a voice, and with plaintive cries will make known her fear; but the fear of this vast dumb brute of the sea, was chained up and enchanted in him; he had no voice, save that choking respiration through his spiracle, and this made the sight of him unspeakably pitiable; while still, in his amazing bulk, portcullis jaw, and omnipotent tail, there was enough to appal the stoutest man who so pitied.
Miss Murdstone, by an expressive sound, a long drawn respiration, which was neither a sigh nor a moan, but was like both, gave it as her opinion that he should have done this at first.
We likewise perceive from this, that the true use of respiration is to bring sufficient fresh air into the lungs, to cause the blood which flows into them from the right ventricle of the heart, where it has been rarefied and, as it were, changed into vapors, to become thick, and to convert it anew into blood, before it flows into the left cavity, without which process it would be unfit for the nourishment of the fire that is there.
He was sleeping soundly, his heart rose and fell with regular respiration.
I had thought well over it; but of what good was that, since the carbonic acid produced by our respiration had invaded every part of the vessel?
As D'Artagnan pursued his investigations, a more abundant and more icy sweat rolled in large drops from his forehead; his heart was oppressed by a horrible anguish; his respiration was broken and short.
Two soldiers were accordingly sent for, and the inspector descended a stairway, so foul, so humid, so dark, as to be loathsome to sight, smell, and respiration.
He was always ready to do them any good offices that lay in his power; as for example, when they wanted a breeze to turn their windmills, the Giant would set all the sails a-going with the mere natural respiration of his lungs.
She fell on her knees by the side of the inanimate Louisa, tearing from the person of her friend, with instinctive readiness, such parts of her dress as might obstruct her respiration, and encouraging their only safeguard, the dog, at the same time, by the sounds of her voice.
By the time his respiration returned, he had fixed his plans for the campaign.
It was my task at first to keep up the artificial respiration in the body after the transfusion had been effected, but presently Meunier relieved me, and I could see the wondrous slow return of life; the breast began to heave, the inspirations became stronger, the eyelids quivered, and the soul seemed to have returned beneath them.