respite


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res·pite

 (rĕs′pĭt)
n.
1. A usually short period of rest or relief. See Synonyms at pause.
2. Law
a. Temporary suspension of the execution of a sentence.
b. Forbearance or delay, as granted in the payment of a debt.
tr.v. res·pit·ed, res·pit·ing, res·pites
1. To delay (a legal sentence, for example); postpone.
2. To grant a respite to (someone).
adj.
Relating to or being a respite: respite care.

[Middle English, from Old French respit, from Latin respectus, refuge, looking back; see respect.]

respite

(ˈrɛspɪt; -paɪt)
n
1. a pause from exertion; interval of rest
2. a temporary delay
3. a temporary stay of execution; reprieve
vb
(tr) to grant a respite to; reprieve
[C13: from Old French respit, from Latin respectus a looking back; see respect]
ˈrespiteless adj

res•pite

(ˈrɛs pɪt)

n., v. -pit•ed, -pit•ing. n.
1. a delay or cessation for a time, esp. of anything distressing or trying; an interval of relief.
2. temporary suspension of a death sentence; reprieve; stay.
v.t.
3. to relieve temporarily, esp. from anything distressing or trying.
4. to grant delay in the carrying out of (a punishment, obligation, etc.); postpone.
[1200–50; (n.) Middle English respit < Old French < Latin respectus (see respect); (v.) Middle English < Old French respitier < Latin respectāre, frequentative of respicere to look back; see respect]

Respite

 

busman’s holiday A vacation or day off from work spent in an activity of the same nature as one’s usual occupation. There are Britishers who say that the regular driver of a London bus actually did spend one of his days off riding as a passenger alongside the driver who was taking his place, but thus far no evidence has been found to substantiate the story. The expression has been in use since 1893.

come up for air To take a breather, take five, take time out; to relax, rest, or enjoy a respite. The phrase implies that one has been so inundated with work or immersed in work that he is in danger of drowning, figuratively speaking; like an underwater swimmer or a diver he must pause to refresh himself and recoup his powers for the next lap.

hang up one’s hatchet See RETIREMENT.

pit stop A brief stop at a restaurant or rest area to break the monotony of an automobile trip and allow passengers to stretch their legs; a short stay at a place while en route to a distant destination. This expression derives from the auto racing pit referring to the area alongside a speedway where cars stop to be serviced or refueled.

rest on one’s oars To relax after strenuous exertion; to suspend one’s efforts temporarily; to take it easy for a while. Often this boating phrase is extended to mean ceasing one’s labors altogether, relying on the momentum of past performance to carry one along. In this sense it is virtually synonymous with rest on one’s laurels. Rest on one’s oars was used literally in the early 18th century, and figuratively shortly thereafter.

The managers of the usual autumn gathering of paintings … will rest on their oars. (Athenaeum, April, 1887)

respite


Past participle: respited
Gerund: respiting

Imperative
respite
respite
Present
I respite
you respite
he/she/it respites
we respite
you respite
they respite
Preterite
I respited
you respited
he/she/it respited
we respited
you respited
they respited
Present Continuous
I am respiting
you are respiting
he/she/it is respiting
we are respiting
you are respiting
they are respiting
Present Perfect
I have respited
you have respited
he/she/it has respited
we have respited
you have respited
they have respited
Past Continuous
I was respiting
you were respiting
he/she/it was respiting
we were respiting
you were respiting
they were respiting
Past Perfect
I had respited
you had respited
he/she/it had respited
we had respited
you had respited
they had respited
Future
I will respite
you will respite
he/she/it will respite
we will respite
you will respite
they will respite
Future Perfect
I will have respited
you will have respited
he/she/it will have respited
we will have respited
you will have respited
they will have respited
Future Continuous
I will be respiting
you will be respiting
he/she/it will be respiting
we will be respiting
you will be respiting
they will be respiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been respiting
you have been respiting
he/she/it has been respiting
we have been respiting
you have been respiting
they have been respiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been respiting
you will have been respiting
he/she/it will have been respiting
we will have been respiting
you will have been respiting
they will have been respiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been respiting
you had been respiting
he/she/it had been respiting
we had been respiting
you had been respiting
they had been respiting
Conditional
I would respite
you would respite
he/she/it would respite
we would respite
you would respite
they would respite
Past Conditional
I would have respited
you would have respited
he/she/it would have respited
we would have respited
you would have respited
they would have respited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.respite - a (temporary) relief from harm or discomfortrespite - a (temporary) relief from harm or discomfort
relief, ease - the condition of being comfortable or relieved (especially after being relieved of distress); "he enjoyed his relief from responsibility"; "getting it off his conscience gave him some ease"
2.respite - a pause from doing something (as work)respite - a pause from doing something (as work); "we took a 10-minute break"; "he took time out to recuperate"
pause - temporary inactivity
spring break - a week or more of recess during the spring term at school
3.respite - an interruption in the intensity or amount of somethingrespite - an interruption in the intensity or amount of something
break, interruption - some abrupt occurrence that interrupts an ongoing activity; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt"
defervescence - abatement of a fever as indicated by a reduction in body temperature
remission, subsidence, remittal - an abatement in intensity or degree (as in the manifestations of a disease); "his cancer is in remission"
4.respite - a pause for relaxationrespite - a pause for relaxation; "people actually accomplish more when they take time for short rests"
pause, suspension, intermission, interruption, break - a time interval during which there is a temporary cessation of something
5.respite - the act of reprieving; postponing or remitting punishment
mercy, clemency, mercifulness - leniency and compassion shown toward offenders by a person or agency charged with administering justice; "he threw himself on the mercy of the court"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Verb1.respite - postpone the punishment of a convicted criminal, such as an execution
postpone, prorogue, put off, defer, set back, shelve, table, put over, remit, hold over - hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"

respite

noun
1. pause, break, rest, relief, halt, interval, relaxation, recess, interruption, lull, cessation, let-up (informal), breathing space, breather (informal), hiatus, intermission I rang home during a brief respite at work.
2. reprieve, stay, delay, suspension, moratorium, postponement, adjournment Devaluation would only give the economy brief respite.

respite

noun
1. A pause or interval, as from work or duty:
Informal: breather.
2. Temporary immunity from penalties:
Translations
مُهْلَة، فَتْرَة راحَه أو إسْتِراحَه
odklad
pausepusterum
hvíld, hlé
atokvėpis
atelpa

respite

[ˈrespaɪt] N (gen) → respiro m, tregua f (Jur) → prórroga f, plazo m
without respitesin descanso
to get no respiteno tener alivio, no poder descansar
we got no respite from the heatel calor apenas nos dejó respirar
they gave us no respiteno nos dejaron respirar

respite

[ˈrɛspaɪt] n
(= break) → répit m
there was no respite from ...
There was absolutely no respite from the noise → Le bruit ne laissait aucun instant de répit.
(= delay) → répit m
The creditors gave them three months' respite → Les créanciers leur ont accordé trois mois de répit.respite care nsoins mpl de répit

respite

n
(= rest)Ruhepause f(from von); (= easing off)Nachlassen nt; without (a) respiteohne Unterbrechung or Pause
(= reprieve)Aufschub m

respite

[ˈrɛspaɪt] n (frm) → tregua, requie
without respite → senza tregua or requie
they gave us no respite → non ci hanno dato tregua

respite

(ˈrespait) , ((American) -pit) noun
a pause or rest.

respite

n relevo, respiro, descanso; (V. también respite care bajo care.)
References in classic literature ?
During his short conference, Heyward, finding a respite from his gravest fears, had leisure to admire the cautious manner in which the Hurons had made their approaches, even after hostilities had ceased.
It was his brightness indeed that gave me a respite.
And half concealed in this queer tenement, I at length found one who by his aspect seemed to have authority; and who, it being noon, and the ship's work suspended, was now enjoying respite from the burden of command.
she had then been only daring to hope for a little respite of suffering;she was now in an exquisite flutter of happiness, and such happiness moreover as she believed must still be greater when the flutter should have passed away.
Jealousy had got hold of him: she stung him; but the sting was salutary: it gave him respite from the gnawing fang of melancholy.
Catherine and he were constant companions still at his seasons of respite from labour; but he had ceased to express his fondness for her in words, and recoiled with angry suspicion from her girlish caresses, as if conscious there could be no gratification in lavishing such marks of affection on him.
Micawber's influence, though exercised in the tripartite character of woman, wife, and mother, it is my intention to fly from myself for a short period, and devote a respite of eight-and-forty hours to revisiting some metropolitan scenes of past enjoyment.
Go therfore mighty powers, Terror of Heav'n, though fall'n; intend at home, While here shall be our home, what best may ease The present misery, and render Hell More tollerable; if there be cure or charm To respite or deceive, or slack the pain Of this ill Mansion: intermit no watch Against a wakeful Foe, while I abroad Through all the coasts of dark destruction seek Deliverance for us all: this enterprize None shall partake with me.
The situation of Cedric and of the Black Knight was now truly dangerous, and would have been still more so, but for the constancy of the archers in the barbican, who ceased not to shower their arrows upon the battlements, distracting the attention of those by whom they were manned, and thus affording a respite to their two chiefs from the storm of missiles which must otherwise have overwhelmed them.
He then visited the prince's mother, and after telling her of his disappointment and of the further respite he had given his son, he added: "I know that Camaralzaman confides more in you than he does in me.
One will pass all the hours of the night seated at the foot of some oak or rock, and there, without having closed his weeping eyes, the sun finds him in the morning bemused and bereft of sense; and another without relief or respite to his sighs, stretched on the burning sand in the full heat of the sultry summer noontide, makes his appeal to the compassionate heavens, and over one and the other, over these and all, the beautiful Marcela triumphs free and careless.
The respite my unexpected agility had given me permitted me to formulate plans for the immediate future and to note more closely the appearance of the warriors, for I could not disassociate these people in my mind from those other warriors who, only the day before, had been pursuing me.