restaurant

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res·tau·rant

 (rĕs′-tə-ränt′, -tər-ənt)
n.
A place where meals are served to the public.

[French, restorative soup, restaurant, from present participle of restaurer, to restore, from Old French restorer; see restore.]

restaurant

(ˈrɛstəˌrɒŋ; ˈrɛstrɒŋ; -rɒnt)
n
a commercial establishment where meals are prepared and served to customers
[C19: from French, from restaurer to restore]

res•tau•rant

(ˈrɛs tər ənt, -təˌrɑnt, -trɑnt)

n.
an establishment where meals are served to customers.
[1830–40, Amer.; < French, n. use of present participle of restaurer < Latin restaurāre to restore]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restaurant - a building where people go to eatrestaurant - a building where people go to eat  
bistro - a small informal restaurant; serves wine
brasserie - a small restaurant serving beer and wine as well as food; usually cheap
brewpub - a combination brewery and restaurant; beer is brewed for consumption on the premises and served along with food
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
cafe, coffee bar, coffee shop, coffeehouse - a small restaurant where drinks and snacks are sold
cafeteria - a restaurant where you serve yourself and pay a cashier
canteen - restaurant in a factory; where workers can eat
mobile canteen, canteen - a restaurant outside; often for soldiers or policemen
diner - a restaurant that resembles a dining car
greasy spoon - a small restaurant specializing in short-order fried foods
grill, grillroom - a restaurant where food is cooked on a grill
hash house - an inexpensive restaurant
lunchroom - a restaurant (in a facility) where lunch can be purchased
rotisserie - a restaurant that specializes in roasted and barbecued meats
chophouse, steakhouse - a restaurant that specializes in steaks
tea parlor, tea parlour, teahouse, tearoom, teashop - a restaurant where tea and light meals are available
restaurant chain - a chain of restaurants

restaurant

noun café, diner (chiefly U.S. & Canad.), bistro, cafeteria, trattoria, tearoom, eatery or eaterie We had dinner in the hotel's restaurant.
Translations
restaurace
restaurant
restoracio
ravintola
restorangostionica
étteremvendéglő
veitingahúsveitingastaîur
レストラン食堂
식당
restoranas
restaurant
reštaurácia
restavracija
restaurang
ร้านอาหาร
nhà hàng

restaurant

[ˈrestərɒŋ]
A. Nrestaurante m
B. CPD restaurant car N (Brit) → coche-comedor m

restaurant

[ˈrɛstərɒnt]
nrestaurant m
We don't often go to restaurants → Nous n'allons pas souvent au restaurant.
modif [chain, food, meal, kitchen, manager, owner, staff] → de restaurant; [prices] → de la restauration; [critic, guide, review] → gastronomiquerestaurant car n (British)wagon-restaurant m

restaurant

nRestaurant nt, → Gaststätte f; restaurant food/pricesRestaurantessen nt/-preise pl

restaurant

[ˈrɛstˌrɒŋ] nristorante m

restaurant

(ˈrestront) , ((American) -tərənt) noun
a place where meals may be bought and eaten.
ˈrestaurant-car noun
a carriage on a train in which meals are served to travellers.

restaurant

مَطْعَم restaurace restaurant Restaurant εστιατόριο restaurante ravintola restaurant restoran ristorante レストラン 식당 restaurant restaurant restauracja restaurante ресторан restaurang ร้านอาหาร restoran nhà hàng 餐馆
References in classic literature ?
He tried in stores and offices, in restaurants and hotels, along the docks and in the railroad yards, in warehouses and mills and factories where they made products that went to every corner of the world.
The windows of the sumptuous restaurants stand open, and one breakfasts there and enjoys the passing show.
With his free arm, the Persian drew the young man to his chest and, suddenly, the mirror turned, in a blinding daze of cross-lights: it turned like one of those revolving doors which have lately been fixed to the entrances of most restaurants, it turned, carrying Raoul and the Persian with it and suddenly hurling them from the full light into the deepest darkness.
Passepartout wandered for several hours in the midst of this motley crowd, looking in at the windows of the rich and curious shops, the jewellery establishments glittering with quaint Japanese ornaments, the restaurants decked with streamers and banners, the tea-houses, where the odorous beverage was being drunk with saki, a liquor concocted from the fermentation of rice, and the comfortable smoking-houses, where they were puffing, not opium, which is almost unknown in Japan, but a very fine, stringy tobacco.
There is a tendency to utilize underground space for the less ornamental purposes of civilization; there is the Metropolitan Railway in London, for instance, there are new electric railways, there are subways, there are underground workrooms and restaurants, and they increase and multiply.
There won't be any more blessed concerts for a million years or so; there won't be any Royal Academy of Arts, and no nice little feeds at restaurants.
To the Chinese such commonplace things as marriage, friendship, and home have an infinitely deeper meaning than can be attached to them by civilisation which practically lives abroad, in the hotels and restaurants and open houses of others, where there is no sanctity of the life within, no shrine set apart for the hidden family re-union, and the cult of the ancestral spirit.
And then he--a wanderer on the earth, a man without fortune, a man without family, a soldier accustomed to inns, cabarets, taverns, and restaurants, a lover of wine forced to depend upon chance treats--was about to partake of family meals, to enjoy the pleasures of a comfortable establishment, and to give himself up to those little attentions which "the harder one is, the more they please," as old soldiers say.
When not engaged in reading Virgil, Homer, or Mistral, in parks, restaurants, streets, and suchlike public places, he indited sonnets (in French) to the eyes, ears, chin, hair, and other visible perfections of a nymph called Therese, the daughter, honesty compels me to state, of a certain Madame Leonore who kept a small cafe for sailors in one of the narrowest streets of the old town.
Several times she sent me to give the General an airing in the streets, even as she might have done with a lacquey and her spaniel; but, I preferred to take him to the theatre, to the Bal Mabille, and to restaurants.
He liked making up parties of his friends and conducting them to the theatre, and taking them to drive on high drags or to dine at remote restaurants.
In other respects the Cafe de Bon-Bon might be said to differ little from the usual restaurants of the period.