restitution


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to restitution: rescission

res·ti·tu·tion

 (rĕs′tĭ-to͞o′shən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The act of restoring to the rightful owner something that has been taken away, lost, or surrendered.
2. The act of making good or compensating for loss, damage, or injury; indemnification.
3. A return to or restoration of a previous state or position.

restitution

(ˌrɛstɪˈtjuːʃən)
n
1. the act of giving back something that has been lost or stolen
2. (Law) law the act of compensating for loss or injury by reverting as far as possible to the position before such injury occurred
3. (General Physics) the return of an object or system to its original state, esp a restoration of shape after elastic deformation
[C13: from Latin rēstitūtiō, from rēstituere to rebuild, from re- + statuere to set up]
ˈrestiˌtutive, ˌrestiˈtutory adj

res•ti•tu•tion

(ˌrɛs tɪˈtu ʃən, -ˈtyu-)

n.
1. reparation made by giving an equivalent or compensation for loss, damage, or injury caused.
2. the restoration of property or rights previously taken away, conveyed, or surrendered.
3. restoration to the former or original state or position.
[1350–1400; Middle English restitucioun < Old French restitution < Latin restitūtiō rebuilding, restoration]
res′ti•tute`, v.t., v.i. -tut•ed, -tut•ing.
res′ti•tu`tive, adj.
syn: See redress.

restitution

The process of determining the true planimetric position of objects whose images appear on photographs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restitution - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injuryrestitution - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)
relief - (law) redress awarded by a court; "was the relief supposed to be protection from future harm or compensation for past injury?"
actual damages, compensatory damages, general damages - (law) compensation for losses that can readily be proven to have occurred and for which the injured party has the right to be compensated
nominal damages - (law) a trivial sum (usually $1.00) awarded as recognition that a legal injury was sustained (as for technical violations of a contract)
exemplary damages, punitive damages, smart money - (law) compensation in excess of actual damages (a form of punishment awarded in cases of malicious or willful misconduct)
atonement, expiation, satisfaction - compensation for a wrong; "we were unable to get satisfaction from the local store"
2.restitution - the act of restoring something to its original state
fixing, repair, mend, mending, reparation, fix, fixture - the act of putting something in working order again
3.restitution - getting something back again; "upon the restitution of the book to its rightful owner the child was given a tongue lashing"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
clawback - finding a way to take money back from people that they were given in another way; "the Treasury will find some clawback for the extra benefits members received"

restitution

noun
2. return, return, replacement, restoration, reinstatement, re-establishment, reinstallation the restitution of their equal rights as citizens

restitution

noun
Translations
إعادَة الشيء إلى صاحِبِه، تَعْويض
náhrada
erstatning
òaî aî skila e-u; bætur
nuosavybės teisių atkūrimasnuostolių padengimas
atpakaļatdošana
ödemetazmin

restitution

[ˌrestɪˈtjuːʃən] N
1. (= return) → restitución f
to make restitution of sth to sbrestituir algo a algn, devolver algo a algn
2. (= compensation) to make restitution to sb for sthindemnizar a algn por algo

restitution

n
(= giving back)Rückgabe f; (of money)Rückerstattung f, → Rückgabe f; to make restitution of something (form)etw zurückgeben/zurückerstatten; restitution of conjugal rights (Jur) → Wiederherstellung fder ehelichen Gemeinschaft
(= reparation)Schadenersatz m, → Entschädigung f

restitution

[ˌrɛstɪˈtjuːʃn] n (act) → restituzione f; (reparation) → riparazione f

restitution

(restiˈtjuːʃən) noun
the act of giving back to a person etc what has been taken away, or the giving of money etc to pay for damage, loss or injury.
References in classic literature ?
Such being the case, and he, the old bachelor, in possession of the ill-gotten spoil,--with the black stain of blood sunken deep into it, and still to be scented by conscientious nostrils, --the question occurred, whether it were not imperative upon him, even at this late hour, to make restitution to Maule's posterity.
Michael had inherited his father's temper, unredeemed by his father's better qualities: his second letter reiterated the charges contained in the first, and declared that he would only accept the offered division as an act of atonement and restitution on Andrew's part.
For example: You brought a divorce case, or a restitution case, into the Consistory.
And now,'' said Prior Aymer, ``I will pray you of restitution of my mules and palfreys, and the freedom of the reverend brethren attending upon me, and also of the gymmal rings, jewels, and fair vestures, of which I have been despoiled, having now satisfied you for my ransom as a true prisoner.
If poor Athanase had been living, she meant to do as many noble souls, who are moneyless, dream of doing, and as the rich never think of doing,--she meant to have sent him several thousand francs, writing up the envelope the words: "Money due to your father from a comrade who makes restitution to you.
The habit of not writing, indeed, was already fixed before he had begun to come into his fortune; and it was only the difficulty of breaking this long silence that withheld him from an instant restitution of the money he had stolen or (as he preferred to call it) borrowed.
No, your excellency," returned Bertuccio; "it was a vendetta followed by restitution.
Charity they feel to be a ridiculously inadequate mode of partial restitution, or a sentimental dole, usually accompanied by some impertinent attempt on the part of the sentimentalist to tyrannise over their private lives.
He was astonished either at the marvelous duplicity of this man and the superior style in which he played his part, or at the good loyal faith with which he presented his request, in a situation in which concerning a million of money, risked against the blow from a dagger, amidst an army that would have looked upon the theft as a restitution.
The spirits are pointing the way to penitence, and urging the thief to restitution.
Show them the restitution of lost humanity, in the future, by Russian thought alone, and by means of the God and of the Christ of our Russian faith, and you will see how mighty and just and wise and good a giant will rise up before the eyes of the astonished and frightened world; astonished because they expect nothing but the sword from us, because they think they will get nothing out of us but barbarism.
The divine tribunal had changed its aspect for him; self-prostration was no longer enough, and he must bring restitution in his hand.