restitution

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res·ti·tu·tion

 (rĕs′tĭ-to͞o′shən, -tyo͞o′-)
n.
1. The act of restoring to the rightful owner something that has been taken away, lost, or surrendered.
2. The act of making good or compensating for loss, damage, or injury; indemnification.
3. A return to or restoration of a previous state or position.

restitution

(ˌrɛstɪˈtjuːʃən)
n
1. the act of giving back something that has been lost or stolen
2. (Law) law the act of compensating for loss or injury by reverting as far as possible to the position before such injury occurred
3. (General Physics) the return of an object or system to its original state, esp a restoration of shape after elastic deformation
[C13: from Latin rēstitūtiō, from rēstituere to rebuild, from re- + statuere to set up]
ˈrestiˌtutive, ˌrestiˈtutory adj

res•ti•tu•tion

(ˌrɛs tɪˈtu ʃən, -ˈtyu-)

n.
1. reparation made by giving an equivalent or compensation for loss, damage, or injury caused.
2. the restoration of property or rights previously taken away, conveyed, or surrendered.
3. restoration to the former or original state or position.
[1350–1400; Middle English restitucioun < Old French restitution < Latin restitūtiō rebuilding, restoration]
res′ti•tute`, v.t., v.i. -tut•ed, -tut•ing.
res′ti•tu`tive, adj.
syn: See redress.

restitution

The process of determining the true planimetric position of objects whose images appear on photographs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.restitution - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injuryrestitution - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)
relief - (law) redress awarded by a court; "was the relief supposed to be protection from future harm or compensation for past injury?"
actual damages, compensatory damages, general damages - (law) compensation for losses that can readily be proven to have occurred and for which the injured party has the right to be compensated
nominal damages - (law) a trivial sum (usually $1.00) awarded as recognition that a legal injury was sustained (as for technical violations of a contract)
exemplary damages, punitive damages, smart money - (law) compensation in excess of actual damages (a form of punishment awarded in cases of malicious or willful misconduct)
atonement, expiation, satisfaction - compensation for a wrong; "we were unable to get satisfaction from the local store"
2.restitution - the act of restoring something to its original state
fixing, repair, mend, mending, reparation, fix, fixture - the act of putting something in working order again
3.restitution - getting something back again; "upon the restitution of the book to its rightful owner the child was given a tongue lashing"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
clawback - finding a way to take money back from people that they were given in another way; "the Treasury will find some clawback for the extra benefits members received"

restitution

noun
2. return, return, replacement, restoration, reinstatement, re-establishment, reinstallation the restitution of their equal rights as citizens

restitution

noun
Translations
إعادَة الشيء إلى صاحِبِه، تَعْويض
náhrada
erstatning
òaî aî skila e-u; bætur
nuosavybės teisių atkūrimasnuostolių padengimas
atpakaļatdošana
ödemetazmin

restitution

[ˌrestɪˈtjuːʃən] N
1. (= return) → restitución f
to make restitution of sth to sbrestituir algo a algn, devolver algo a algn
2. (= compensation) to make restitution to sb for sthindemnizar a algn por algo

restitution

n
(= giving back)Rückgabe f; (of money)Rückerstattung f, → Rückgabe f; to make restitution of something (form)etw zurückgeben/zurückerstatten; restitution of conjugal rights (Jur) → Wiederherstellung fder ehelichen Gemeinschaft
(= reparation)Schadenersatz m, → Entschädigung f

restitution

[ˌrɛstɪˈtjuːʃn] n (act) → restituzione f; (reparation) → riparazione f

restitution

(restiˈtjuːʃən) noun
the act of giving back to a person etc what has been taken away, or the giving of money etc to pay for damage, loss or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
Durkheim refers to Law when he differentiates between organic and mechanical solidarity; he considers the Law as restitutive and coercive, respectively, and neglects real Law--the relationship between the individual and things.
Certainly, this is not to say that the pursuit of restitutive justice by early modern Christians was unknown outside of a more or less proscribed ideological sphere of transgression.
It clarifies the concept of global justice and its retributive, protective, and restitutive aspects which are undermined by the shortcomings of political engagements, international responsibilities and constitutional adjustments reflecting international, regional and national realities.
There are also less obvious parallels: the title refers to the restitutive justice that Vasudeva demands for his clansman, but beyond the legend it also draws attention to the primacy of justice in human affairs-a message of striking relevance and immediacy for a society whose judiciary was so frequently sidelined by arbitrary political decisions.
I can tell you that I personally, exhausted by puritan notions of evil, found the maxims of Blake's Marriage of Heaven and Hell a restitutive tonic.
Plural stellar famish Viaducts to carry away and bring back Sewer and thread restitutive Recast deliberate meteorite (Kim 1998, 10)
This is because restitutive approaches and civil remedies are better suited to market-oriented and contract-like relationships than penal regulation and criminal punishment; in the modern state the goal is the reformation of the offender, not the destruction of the body.
Unlike Durkheim (1960), who sees restitutive sanctions as a means to reestablish relationships between individuals and things, Bianchi regards these sanctions as promoters of solidarity relationships among individuals.
The 'virtues of sustainability' are listed as temperance, frugality, farsightedness, attunement and humility, while the 'virtues of respect for nature' are given as ecological sensitivity, care, compassion, nonmaleficence and restitutive justice.
On symbiotic child psychosis: Genetic, dynamic and restitutive aspects.
Over time law underwent a transformation from repressive law to restitutive law (Johnson and Alan 1995).