restorationism


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restorationism

(ˌrɛstəˈreɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) belief in a future life in which human beings will be restored to a state of perfection and happiness
ˌrestoˈrationist n, adj

restorationism

the belief in a temporary future punishment and a final restoration of all sinners to the favor of God. Also called restitutionism. — restorationist, n.
See also: Protestantism
References in periodicals archive ?
There needs to be an attitudinal change at every level, a conversion of mind and heart that conforms us to the spirit of the Gospel, a new wine in new wineskins, not a merely cosmetic change or worse, a retreat into restorationism.
Instead, our investment in an ethnic-nationalist project in historic Palestine has returned us to the world of Kings and to the restorationism of Ezra and Nehemiah.
In any case, MacIntyre does not accept Thomistic restorationism and its counsel to separate Catholic communities from the larger society.
His hopes were that Pentecostals could renew their appreciation of their history against the larger backdrop of renewal movements in Christian history, deepen the sacramental character of Pentecostal doxology, and articulate an ecclesiology of renewal conceived as a balance of restorationism and primitivism in its biblical call to visible unity of all Christians, both for the movement and for the wider Christian communities as a service to the churches.
At the same time, missional movement thinkers can too easily embrace a naive Restorationism, claiming an ability to foster forms of church that skip back over centuries of diverse cultural, linguistic, and theological traditions that necessarily have shaped the church and contextualized the Gospel in diverse and often good ways.
It was the very fleeing of access to the Bible and the fact that Blackstone never attended divinity school to shape his thoughts about his relationship to God that brought his own direct reading to Restorationism as a part of Dispensationalism.
Schaaf, "Loehe's Relation to the American Church," 186; Muenich, "Victory of Restorationism," 32.
Her letters to Gestefeld emphasize a nonesoteric restorationism that meshes with her 1891 description of Christian Science as the "second appearing of Jesus," and their relationship gives better shape to what she meant when she wrote, in the first edition of her textbook in 1875, that Christian Science "will absorb the attention of sage and philosopher at a not far-distant day, but the Christian alone will fathom it.
While readers might be alarmed at possible tendencies toward restorationism, we will see instead a very modest, but fairly widespread, interest in the writings of earlier theologians.
Although the mainline Protestant denominations would drop restorationism (which often co-existed with rank anti-Semitism) and become fierce opponents of Zionism--lest it jeopardize their educational mission to the Muslims--the Zionist theme resonated with most presidents right up through Ronald Reagan.
This powerful Christian tradition emerged in England in the early 1800s, when two theological themes began to merge: Jewish restorationism (the concept that the Jews must return to Palestine in order to the prophetic scriptures), and the literal and futuristic interpretation of the apocalyptic texts.