resurrection


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res·ur·rec·tion

 (rĕz′ə-rĕk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of restoring a dead person, for example, to life.
b. The condition of having been restored to life.
2. Resurrection Christianity
a. The return of Jesus to life on the third day after the Crucifixion.
b. The restoration of the dead to life at the Last Judgment.
3. The act of bringing back to practice, notice, use, or vibrancy; revival: the resurrection of an old custom; the resurrection of a decrepit neighborhood.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin resurrēctiō, resurrēctiōn-, from Latin resurrēctus, past participle of resurgere, to rise again; see resurge.]

res′ur·rec′tion·al adj.

resurrection

(ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃən)
n
1. (Theology) a supposed act or instance of a dead person coming back to life
2. (Theology) belief in the possibility of this as part of a religious or mystical system
3. (Theology) the condition of those who have risen from the dead: we shall all live in the resurrection.
4. the revival of something: a resurrection of an old story.
[C13: via Old French from Late Latin resurrectiō, from Latin resurgere to rise again; see resurge]
ˌresurˈrectional, ˌresurˈrectionary adj

Resurrection

(ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃən)
n
1. (Theology) the rising again of Christ from the tomb three days after his death
2. (Theology) the rising again from the dead of all mankind at the Last Judgment

res•ur•rec•tion

(ˌrɛz əˈrɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of rising from the dead.
2. (cap.) the rising of Christ after His death and burial.
3. (cap.) the rising of the dead on Judgment Day.
4. the state of those risen from the dead.
5. a rising again, as from decay or disuse; revival.
[1250–1300; (< Old French) < Late Latin resurrēctiō < Latin resurreg-, variant s. of resurgere to rise again (see resurge)]
res`ur•rec′tion•al, adj.

resurrection

Rising from the dead. Reports of Jesus’ resurrection convinced many people that Jesus was the Son of God.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.resurrection - (New Testament) the rising of Christ on the third day after the CrucifixionResurrection - (New Testament) the rising of Christ on the third day after the Crucifixion
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible
2.resurrection - a revival from inactivity and disuse; "it produced a resurrection of hope"
resurgence, revitalisation, revitalization, revival, revivification - bringing again into activity and prominence; "the revival of trade"; "a revival of a neglected play by Moliere"; "the Gothic revival in architecture"

resurrection

noun
1. revival, restoration, renewal, resurgence, return, comeback (informal), renaissance, rebirth, reappearance, resuscitation, renascence This is a resurrection of an old story.
revival killing off
2. (usually caps) raising or rising from the dead, return from the dead, restoration to life the Resurrection of Jesus Christ
raising or rising from the dead demise, burial
Quotations
"I am the resurrection, and the life" Bible: St. John

resurrection

noun
Translations
بَعْث
vzkříšení
genopstandelse
upprisa
prisikėlimas
augšāmcelšanās
vzkriesenie
dirilme

resurrection

[ˌrezəˈrekʃən] N (Rel) → Resurrección f (fig) → resurrección f

Resurrection

[ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃən] n (RELIGION) the Resurrection → la Résurrection

resurrection

[ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃən] n [career, belief, tradition, practice] → résurrection f

resurrection

n
(lit, of person) → Wiederbelebung f; the Resurrection (Rel) → die Auferstehung
(fig, of law) → Wiedereinführung f; (of custom, fashion, style)Wiederbelebung f; (of ideas, memories)Auflebenlassen nt

Resurrection

[ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃn] n (Rel) the Resurrectionla Risurrezione

resurrection

[ˌrɛzəˈrɛkʃn] nrisurrezione f

resurrection

(rezəˈrekʃən) noun
the process of being brought to life again after death.
References in classic literature ?
above all, For the resurrection of deep-buried faith In Truth -- in Virtue -- in Humanity -- Of all who, on Despair's unhallowed bed Lying down to die, have suddenly arisen At thy soft-murmured words, "Let there be light
A moving hymn was sung, and the text followed: "I am the Resurrection and the Life.
The mixed, singular, luminous gloom in which they walked along together to the spot where the cows lay, often made him think of the Resurrection hour.
First, during the ceremonies on Good Friday, the day when Christ was crucified, the cross which stood all the year above the altar, bearing the Savior's figure, was taken down and laid beneath the altar, a dramatic symbol of the Death and Burial; and two days later, on 'the third day' of the Bible phraseology, that is on Easter Sunday, as the story of the Resurrection was chanted by the choir, the cross was uncovered and replaced, amid the rejoicings of the congregation.
He didn't understand that that consciousness might be the promise of a future crisis, of a new view of life and of his future resurrection.
I lay there dismally calculating that sixteen entire hours must elapse before I could hope for a resurrection.
What has handling my face got to do with the resurrection of this damsel?
She was fully prepared for the end and entered into rest with the complete assurance of a blessed resurrection and with resignation to the divine will of our blessed Lord Jesus Christ.
The love of country in all the Italian poets and romancers of the long period of the national resurrection ennobled their art in a measure which criticism has not yet taken account of.
But such illusions were usually dissipated, on coming out of church, by hearing his voice in jocund colloquy with some of the Melthams or Greens, or, perhaps, the Murrays themselves; probably laughing at his own sermon, and hoping that he had given the rascally people something to think about; perchance, exulting in the thought that old Betty Holmes would now lay aside the sinful indulgence of her pipe, which had been her daily solace for upwards of thirty years: that George Higgins would be frightened out of his Sabbath evening walks, and Thomas Jackson would be sorely troubled in his conscience, and shaken in his sure and certain hope of a joyful resurrection at the last day.
The letters were upside down to me from where I sat, but Lucy was more opposite to them, so she leant over and read, "Sacred to the memory of George Canon, who died, in the hope of a glorious resurrection, on July 29,1873, falling from the rocks at Kettleness.
bear a hand there with those screws, and let's finish it before the resurrection fellow comes a-calling with his horn for all legs, true or false, as brewery-men go round collecting old beer barrels, to fill 'em up again.