retainer


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re·tain·er 1

 (rĭ-tā′nər)
n.
1. One that retains, as a device, frame, or groove that restrains or guides.
2. Dentistry An appliance used to hold teeth in position after orthodontic treatment.
3.
a. An employee, typically a long-term employee.
b. A servant or an attendant, especially one in the household of a person of high rank.

re·tain·er 2

 (rĭ-tā′nər)
n.
1. The act of engaging the services of a professional adviser, such as an attorney, counselor, or consultant.
2. The fee paid to retain a professional adviser.

retainer

(rɪˈteɪnə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history a supporter or dependant of a person of rank, esp a soldier
2. a servant, esp one who has been with a family for a long time
3. (Mechanical Engineering) a clip, frame, or similar device that prevents a part of a machine, engine, etc, from moving
4. (Dentistry) a dental appliance for holding a loose tooth or prosthetic device in position
5. a fee paid in advance to secure first option on the services of a barrister, jockey, etc
6. a reduced rent paid for a flat, room, etc, during absence to reserve it for future use

re•tain•er1

(rɪˈteɪ nər)

n.
1. one that retains.
2. a servant or attendant who has been with a family for many years.
3. (esp. in feudal times) a person attached to a noble household and owing it occasional service.
4. any of various devices for maintaining the position of the natural teeth, attaching or stabilizing a denture, etc.
[1530–40]

re•tain•er2

(rɪˈteɪ nər)

n.
1. the act of retaining in one's service.
2. the fact of being retained.
3. a fee paid to secure services, as of a lawyer.
[1425–75; reteinir, probably n. use of Middle French retenir to retain; see -er3]

retainer

the fee paid to a professional person, as a lawyer, to engage his services.
See also: Dues and Payment
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retainer - a fee charged in advance to retain the services of someone
fee - a fixed charge for a privilege or for professional services
quid pro quo, quid - something for something; that which a party receives (or is promised) in return for something he does or gives or promises
2.retainer - a person working in the service of another (especially in the household)retainer - a person working in the service of another (especially in the household)
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
body servant - a valet or personal maid
cabin boy - a young man acting as a servant on a ship
domestic, domestic help, house servant - a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
factotum - a servant employed to do a variety of jobs
familiar - a person attached to the household of a high official (as a pope or bishop) who renders service in return for support
flunkey, flunky, lackey - a male servant (especially a footman)
major-domo, seneschal - the chief steward or butler of a great household
manservant - a man servant
menial - a domestic servant
scullion - a kitchen servant employed to do menial tasks (especially washing)
servant girl, serving girl - a girl who is a servant
3.retainer - a dental appliance that holds teeth (or a prosthesis) in position after orthodontic treatment
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth

retainer

noun
1. fee, advance, deposit, partial payment, retaining fee I'll need a five-hundred-dollar retainer.
2. servant, domestic, attendant, valet, supporter, dependant, henchman, footman, lackey, vassal, flunky the ever-faithful family retainer
Translations

retainer

[rɪˈteɪnəʳ] N
1. (= servant) → criado/a m/f
family retainer; old retainerviejo criado m (que lleva muchos años sirviendo en la misma familia)
2. (= fee) → anticipo m; (= payment on flat, room) → depósito m, señal f (para que se guarde el piso etc)

retainer

[rɪˈteɪnər] n
(= fee) → acompte m
(old-fashioned) (= servant) → serviteur mretaining wall nmur m de soutènement

retainer

n
(old: = servant) → Faktotum nt
(= fee)Vorschuss m

retainer

[rɪˈteɪnəʳ] n
a. (fee) → onorario (versato in anticipo)
b. (servant) → servitore m

re·tain·er

n. [dentistry] aro, freno de retención.

retainer

n (orthodontics) retenedor m
References in classic literature ?
The councils were held in great state, for every member felt as if sitting in parliament, and every retainer and dependent looked up to the assemblage with awe, as to the House of Lords.
A fifth retainer, proceeding up the staircase with a mournful air--as who should say, 'Here is another wretched creature come to dinner; such is life
Among all races when a certain stage of social development is reached at least one such minstrel is to be found as a regular retainer at the court of every barbarous chief or king, ready to entertain the warriors at their feasts, with chants of heroes and battles and of the exploits of their present lord.
Lorry) had become their daily retainer, and had his bed there every night.
Nobody venturing to dispute these positions, he proceeded to observe that the human hair was a great retainer of tobacco-smoke, and that the young gentlemen of Westminster and Eton, after eating vast quantities of apples to conceal any scent of cigars from their anxious friends, were usually detected in consequence of their heads possessing this remarkable property; when he concluded that if the Royal Society would turn their attention to the circumstance, and endeavour to find in the resources of science a means of preventing such untoward revelations, they might indeed be looked upon as benefactors to mankind.
A stout little retainer came in with chains and led them away, looking very much frightened and evidently forgetting the speech he ought to have made.
There was a common head, chieftain, or sovereign, whose authority extended over the whole nation; and a number of subordinate vassals, or feudatories, who had large portions of land allotted to them, and numerous trains of INFERIOR vassals or retainers, who occupied and cultivated that land upon the tenure of fealty or obedience, to the persons of whom they held it.
A word to De Clare, or De Montfort would bring the barons and their retainers forty thousand strong to overwhelm the King's forces.
Then he bade all his servants and retainers to make ready to go to London Town, to see and speak with the King.
De Beausset bowed low, with that courtly French bow which only the old retainers of the Bourbons knew how to make, and approached him, presenting an envelope.
If the people yield, well and good; but if they resist him, as he began by beating his own father and mother, so now, if he has the power, he beats them, and will keep his dear old fatherland or motherland, as the Cretans say, in subjection to his young retainers whom he has introduced to be their rulers and masters.
It was then approaching sundown, but none of the retainers or villagers dared rescue the imprisoned ones that night, for fear of Robin Hood's men.