reticence


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ret·i·cent

 (rĕt′ĭ-sənt)
adj.
1. Inclined to keep one's thoughts, feelings, and personal affairs to oneself. See Synonyms at laconic.
2. Restrained or reserved: "The laughter was steady, if reticent" (Bernard Lown).
3. Usage Problem Reluctant; unwilling.

[Latin reticēns, reticent-, present participle of reticēre, to keep silent : re-, re- + tacēre, to be silent.]

ret′i·cence (-səns) adv.
ret′i·cent·ly adv.
Usage Note: Reticent is generally used to indicate a reluctance to speak. Most commentators on usage have criticized its extended use as an all-purpose synonym for reluctant. In our 2001 survey, 83 percent of the Panel found unacceptable the sentence A lot of out-of-towners are reticent to come to the Twin Cities for a ballgame if there's a chance the game will be rained out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reticence - the trait of being uncommunicative; not volunteering anything more than necessary
uncommunicativeness - the trait of being uncommunicative

reticence

noun silence, reserve, restraint, quietness, secretiveness, taciturnity, uncommunicativeness, unforthcomingness She didn't mind his reticence.

reticence

noun
1. The keeping of one's thoughts and emotions to oneself:
2. Reserve in speech, behavior, or dress:
Translations

reticence

[ˈretɪsəns] Nreticencia f, reserva f

reticence

[ˈretɪsəns] nréticence f

reticence

reticence

[ˈrɛtɪsns] nreticenza
References in classic literature ?
And the mere sight of the torment, with his fishy eyes and mouth open, his sandy hair inquisitively on end, and his waistcoat heaving with windy arithmetic, made me vicious in my reticence.
For it would have been impossible for him to hide from Eppie that she was not his own child: even if the most delicate reticence on the point could have been expected from Raveloe gossips in her presence, her own questions about her mother could not have been parried, as she grew up, without that complete shrouding of the past which would have made a painful barrier between their minds.
It is you who have sacrificed me," she said, casting away her reticence, and looking at him for the first time during the conversation.
This reticence exasperated the curiosity of the young ladies, who crowded round little Giry, begging her to explain herself.
Was not all the genius of a loving woman revealed in such a way of lending, in her reticence with regard to a poverty easily guessed?
Followed as he followed it, with a skilful reticence, in a kind of social chiaroscuro, it was still possible for the polite to call him a professional painter.
All the morbid reticence seems to have passed from her, and she has just reminded me, as if I needed any reminding, of that night, and that it was here, on this very seat, I found her asleep.
As to Athos, faithful to his system of reticence, he contented himself with interrogating D'Artagnan by a look.
Perhaps they thought that our means were too modest for them, and, therefore, unworthy of politeness or reticence.
It was not to be supposed that the emotion produced by her aunt's death had blotted out the recollection that I was interested in that lady's relics, and I fidgeted afterward as it came to me that her reticence might very possibly mean simply that nothing had been found.
This reticence upon his part had increased the somewhat inhuman effect which he produced upon me, until sometimes I found myself regarding him as an isolated phenomenon, a brain without a heart, as deficient in human sympathy as he was pre-eminent in intelligence.
As we turned into the Corbury road the snow began to fall again, cutting off our last glimpse of the house; and Frome's silence fell with it, letting down between us the old veil of reticence.