reticulum


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re·tic·u·lum

 (rĭ-tĭk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. re·tic·u·la (-lə)
1. A netlike formation or structure; a network.
2. Zoology The second compartment of the stomach of ruminant mammals, lined with a membrane having honeycombed ridges.
3. Reticulum A constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Dorado and Horologium.

[Latin rēticulum, diminutive of rēte, net.]

reticulum

(rɪˈtɪkjʊləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
1. (Anatomy) any fine network, esp one in the body composed of cells, fibres, etc
2. (Zoology) the second compartment of the stomach of ruminants, situated between the rumen and psalterium
[C17: from Latin: little net, from rēte net]

Reticulum

(rɪˈtɪkjʊləm)
n, Latin genitive Reticuli (rɪˈtɪkjʊˌlaɪ)
(Astronomy) a small constellation in the S hemisphere lying between Dorado and Hydrus

re•tic•u•lum

(rɪˈtɪk yə ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə).
1. a network; any reticulated system or structure.
2.
a. a network of intercellular fibers in certain tissues.
b. a network of structures in the endoplasm or nucleus of certain cells.
3. the second stomach of cows and other ruminants, into which the coarse food regurgitated from the rumen is reswallowed.
[1650–60; < Latin rēticulum little net; see reticle]

re·tic·u·lum

(rĭ-tĭk′yə-ləm)
The second division of the stomach in ruminant animals, which together with the rumen contains microorganisms that digest fiber. The reticulum's contents are regurgitated for further chewing as part of the cud. See more at ruminant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Reticulum - a small constellation in the southern hemisphere near Dorado and Hydrus
2.reticulum - any fine network (especially one in the body composed of cells or blood vessels)
neural net, neural network - any network of neurons or nuclei that function together to perform some function in the body
network, web - an interconnected system of things or people; "he owned a network of shops"; "retirement meant dropping out of a whole network of people who had been part of my life"; "tangled in a web of cloth"
3.reticulum - the second compartment of the stomach of a ruminant
ruminant - any of various cud-chewing hoofed mammals having a stomach divided into four (occasionally three) compartments
stomach, tum, tummy, breadbasket - an enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal; the principal organ of digestion
Translations
čepec
verkkomaha
réticulum

re·tic·u·lum

n. retículo.
1. red de nervios y vasos sanguíneos;
2. tejido reticular.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fully automated special staining machines for pathology (afb, Cab, Iron, Giemsa, Reticulum etc.
When the reticulum was exposed, I was relieved to see the tip of a wire jutting into the abdominal cavity and encased by a mass of fibrin.
Increased rough endoplasmic reticulum and the development of the Golgi complexes were noticed during differentiation of terminal buds into acini.
The cytoplasm contains numerous mitochondria containing distinct lamellar cristae, small patches of rough endoplasmic reticulum as short cisternae, a large dense network of interconnecting tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and round or oval lysosomes.
CDNF (Cerebral Dopamine Neutrophic Factor) is an endoplasmic reticulum located and secreted protein with neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties.
Background: Amyloid [sz] (A[sz]) deposits and the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are both well established in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Super-resolution shots of the endoplasmic reticulum reveal tightly packed tubes where previous pictures showed plain flat sheets, scientists report in the Oct.
won't forget our daughters: they are Reticulum, Gliadin, and
Signals collected from the brightest stars in a tiny galaxy called Reticulum II show far higher concentrations of heavy elements than theorized.
Their cytoplasm is rich in mitochondria, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, and vesicles, while Golgi complexes are sparse.
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contains the protein-folding machinery for secretory proteins and is therefore crucial for insulin biosynthesis.
A preview of titles includes: regulation of alternative splicing through coupling with transcription and chromatin structure; nuclear-ADP-Ribosylation and its role in chromatic plasticity, cell differentiation, and epigenetics; the biology of proteostasis in aging and disease; PIWI-interacting RNA: its biogenesis and functions; structure, dynamics, assembly, and evolution of protein complexes; gating mechanisms of voltage-gated proton channels; form follows function: the importance of endoplasmic reticulum shape; cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.