reticulum


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Related to reticulum: sarcoplasmic reticulum, endoplasmic reticulum, stellate reticulum, Smooth endoplasmic reticulum

re·tic·u·lum

 (rĭ-tĭk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. re·tic·u·la (-lə)
1. A netlike formation or structure; a network.
2. Zoology The second compartment of the stomach of ruminant mammals, lined with a membrane having honeycombed ridges.
3. Reticulum A constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Dorado and Horologium.

[Latin rēticulum, diminutive of rēte, net.]

reticulum

(rɪˈtɪkjʊləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
1. (Anatomy) any fine network, esp one in the body composed of cells, fibres, etc
2. (Zoology) the second compartment of the stomach of ruminants, situated between the rumen and psalterium
[C17: from Latin: little net, from rēte net]

Reticulum

(rɪˈtɪkjʊləm)
n, Latin genitive Reticuli (rɪˈtɪkjʊˌlaɪ)
(Astronomy) a small constellation in the S hemisphere lying between Dorado and Hydrus

re•tic•u•lum

(rɪˈtɪk yə ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə).
1. a network; any reticulated system or structure.
2.
a. a network of intercellular fibers in certain tissues.
b. a network of structures in the endoplasm or nucleus of certain cells.
3. the second stomach of cows and other ruminants, into which the coarse food regurgitated from the rumen is reswallowed.
[1650–60; < Latin rēticulum little net; see reticle]

re·tic·u·lum

(rĭ-tĭk′yə-ləm)
The second division of the stomach in ruminant animals, which together with the rumen contains microorganisms that digest fiber. The reticulum's contents are regurgitated for further chewing as part of the cud. See more at ruminant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Reticulum - a small constellation in the southern hemisphere near Dorado and Hydrus
2.reticulum - any fine network (especially one in the body composed of cells or blood vessels)
neural net, neural network - any network of neurons or nuclei that function together to perform some function in the body
network, web - an interconnected system of things or people; "he owned a network of shops"; "retirement meant dropping out of a whole network of people who had been part of my life"; "tangled in a web of cloth"
3.reticulum - the second compartment of the stomach of a ruminant
ruminant - any of various cud-chewing hoofed mammals having a stomach divided into four (occasionally three) compartments
stomach, tum, tummy, breadbasket - an enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal; the principal organ of digestion
Translations
čepec
verkkomaha
réticulum

re·tic·u·lum

n. retículo.
1. red de nervios y vasos sanguíneos;
2. tejido reticular.
References in periodicals archive ?
Base for building, use: pathology; process: tissue sample; concentrated antibody: no; immunofluorescence: no; histology: si;,high profile blade, use: microtomo; material: teflon;,low profile blade, use: microtomo; material: teflon;,eosin and use: pathology; concentrated antibody: no; immunofluorescence: no; histology: si;,kit reticulum.
The endoplasmic reticulum requires constant renewal and cell turnover to function properly, and autophagy is vital for this process.
reticulatus Kozlowska, Lenz & Melchin, 2009 have similar hoods built of a reticulum (Figs 1E, 2C, E).
GRP78 is a 70kDa heat shock protein, which is involved in protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).
These compartments include the nucleus, which holds genetic information in the form of DNA; the endoplasmic reticulum, which shunts proteins and lipids around the cell; and mitochondria which act as the cell's powerhouse.
For mammals to use the proteins in our bodies, a process called protein folding must occur in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells.
Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated protein secretion and quality control has been shown to play an important role in stress responses in both animals and plants.
Pra-c had a clear effect on blood pressure in SHR, and reversed SHR ventricular remodeling by upregulating the gene expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum PLB.
Although numerous evidences show multiple possible signaling pathways of quercetin in apoptosis, there is no report to address the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in quercetin-induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells.
RBs formation in the endoplasmic reticulum takes place in vivo in various B lymphoproliferative disorder patients as well as in vitro during recombinant IgG overexpression using heterologous cell hosts such as 293 and CHO cells.
In our September 2013 issue we have the following scientific contributions; The antibody response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Hashimoto's thyroiditis; Obesity and insulin resistance: Management in diabetes; Klinefelter syndrome; Exenatide-induced acute renal failure; Cranium metastasis: An unusual presentation of differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Association of acromegaly and multiple myeloma; Radiocontrast-related leucocytoclastic vasculitis misdiagnosed as diabetic foot ulcer in a type 2 diabetic patient; DPP-4 Inhibition in Diabetic Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.
Specialists in various sciences and medical areas in North America, Europe, Asia, and Saudi Arabia discuss such topics as endoplasmic reticulum stress in the cardiovascular system, the functions of microRNAs in cardiovascular biology and disease, the regulation of insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets, the androgen receptor in health and disease, estrogen and cancer, autophagy and intestinal homeostasis, paneth cells, the impact of adult neurogenesis on olfactory bulb circuits and computations, the pathophysiology of migraine, the rhythm of breathing, chloride in vesicular trafficking and function, phosphate transporters and their function, and platelets in lung biology.