retinue


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ret·i·nue

 (rĕt′n-o͞o′, -yo͞o′)
n.
The retainers or attendants accompanying a high-ranking person.

[Middle English retenue, from Old French, from feminine past participle of retenir, to retain; see retain.]

retinue

(ˈrɛtɪˌnjuː)
n
a body of aides and retainers attending an important person, royalty, etc
[C14: from Old French retenue, from retenir to retain]
ˈretiˌnued adj

ret•i•nue

(ˈrɛt nˌu, -ˌyu)

n.
a body of retainers in attendance upon an important personage; suite.
[1325–75; Middle English retinue < Middle French, n. use of feminine past participle of retenir to retain]
ret′i•nued`, adj.

Retinue

 a body of retainers, followers, or attendants, 1375. See also servantry, staff.
Examples: retinue of horses, 1667; of men, 1592; of nymphs, 1595; of officers and servants, 1878; of retainers, 1375; of servants, 1770.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retinue - the group following and attending to some important personretinue - the group following and attending to some important person
assemblage, gathering - a group of persons together in one place
bodyguard - a group of men who escort and protect some important person
royal court, court - the family and retinue of a sovereign or prince

retinue

noun attendants, entourage, escort, servants, following, train, suite, aides, followers, cortege She left, followed by her retinue.

retinue

noun
A group of attendants or followers:
Translations
حاشِيَه، مُرافِقون
družinasvita
følge
fylgdarliî
pavadoņisvīta

retinue

[ˈretɪnjuː] Nséquito m, comitiva f

retinue

[ˈrɛtɪnjuː] nsuite f, cortège m

retinue

nGefolge nt

retinue

[ˈrɛtɪˌnjuː] nseguito, scorta

retinue

(ˈretinjuː) noun
the servants, officials etc who accompany a person of importance.
References in classic literature ?
The gentleman turned to his retinue and said calmly: "Lash me these animals to their kennels
And as individuals get into trouble by making too great a show of liveries, or as slaves when they are too numerous rise against their masters, so I think I could mention a nation that has got into many great difficulties, and will get into many greater, from maintaining too large a retinue of words.
Mean while our Primitive great Sire, to meet His god-like Guest, walks forth, without more train Accompani'd then with his own compleat Perfections, in himself was all his state, More solemn then the tedious pomp that waits On Princes, when thir rich Retinue long Of Horses led, and Grooms besmeard with Gold Dazles the croud, and sets them all agape.
sets forth with his court to a gallant hunting-match in Sherwood Forest, in which, as is not unusual for princes in romance, he falls in with a deer of extraordinary size and swiftness, and pursues it closely, till he has outstripped his whole retinue, tired out hounds and horse, and finds himself alone under the gloom of an extensive forest, upon which night is descending.
I had rather spend my ill-gotten wealth in this way than upon an expensive house and a retinue of servants.
What finer retinue could be expected for his funeral?
No sooner did the king hear that the ship which was just in port had on board the son of his old friend and ally than he hurried to meet the supposed prince, and had him and his retinue brought to the palace, where they were lodged and entertained sumptuously.
This idea made him horribly uneasy, and he resolved to remove the cause of his fears by sending the Prince on his travels escorted by a magnificent retinue.
These qualities have ever been displayed in their mightiest perfection, as attendants in the retinue of strong passions.
Whence it arises," he continued, "that when we see any person well dressed and making a figure with rich garments and retinue of servants, it seems to lead and impel us perforce to respect him, though memory may at the same moment recall to us some lowly condition in which we have seen him, but which, whether it may have been poverty or low birth, being now a thing of the past, has no existence; while the only thing that has any existence is what we see before us; and if this person whom fortune has raised from his original lowly state
Instead of moving, you merely exercise some magic art of vanishing and returning to sight; and instead of any lucid description of your new World, you simply tell me the numbers and sizes of some forty of my retinue, facts known to any child in my capital.
Her name, as I afterward learned, was Sola, and she belonged to the retinue of Tars Tarkas.