retranslate

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re·trans·late

 (rē′trăns-lāt′, -trănz-, rē-trăns′lāt′, -trănz′-)
tr.v. re·trans·lat·ed, re·trans·lat·ing, re·trans·lates
1. To translate (something already translated) in different wording or into a different language.
2. To change the form of (something) into something new.

re′trans·la′tion n.

retranslate

(ˌriːtrænsˈleɪt)
vb (tr)
(Linguistics) to translate (something that has already been translated)

retranslate


Past participle: retranslated
Gerund: retranslating

Imperative
retranslate
retranslate
Present
I retranslate
you retranslate
he/she/it retranslates
we retranslate
you retranslate
they retranslate
Preterite
I retranslated
you retranslated
he/she/it retranslated
we retranslated
you retranslated
they retranslated
Present Continuous
I am retranslating
you are retranslating
he/she/it is retranslating
we are retranslating
you are retranslating
they are retranslating
Present Perfect
I have retranslated
you have retranslated
he/she/it has retranslated
we have retranslated
you have retranslated
they have retranslated
Past Continuous
I was retranslating
you were retranslating
he/she/it was retranslating
we were retranslating
you were retranslating
they were retranslating
Past Perfect
I had retranslated
you had retranslated
he/she/it had retranslated
we had retranslated
you had retranslated
they had retranslated
Future
I will retranslate
you will retranslate
he/she/it will retranslate
we will retranslate
you will retranslate
they will retranslate
Future Perfect
I will have retranslated
you will have retranslated
he/she/it will have retranslated
we will have retranslated
you will have retranslated
they will have retranslated
Future Continuous
I will be retranslating
you will be retranslating
he/she/it will be retranslating
we will be retranslating
you will be retranslating
they will be retranslating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been retranslating
you have been retranslating
he/she/it has been retranslating
we have been retranslating
you have been retranslating
they have been retranslating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been retranslating
you will have been retranslating
he/she/it will have been retranslating
we will have been retranslating
you will have been retranslating
they will have been retranslating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been retranslating
you had been retranslating
he/she/it had been retranslating
we had been retranslating
you had been retranslating
they had been retranslating
Conditional
I would retranslate
you would retranslate
he/she/it would retranslate
we would retranslate
you would retranslate
they would retranslate
Past Conditional
I would have retranslated
you would have retranslated
he/she/it would have retranslated
we would have retranslated
you would have retranslated
they would have retranslated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.retranslate - translate again
translate, interpret, render - restate (words) from one language into another language; "I have to translate when my in-laws from Austria visit the U.S."; "Can you interpret the speech of the visiting dignitaries?"; "She rendered the French poem into English"; "He translates for the U.N."
Translations

retranslate

References in periodicals archive ?
Nersessian begins this difficult task by focusing on Kant's notion of Weltanschauung (which, building on Heidegger, she retranslates as "worldfeel") as it appears in his twinned concepts of enlightenment and orientation.
In Stockton's reading, this is precisely the trajectory of Milton's masque: the story of a young Lady (with a "newly constituting ego") who experiences an early scene of seduction in which she follows Comus ("Shepherd, I take thy word") into the woods, and later retranslates that experience into a "betra[yal of her] credulous innocence" as she undergoes a series of further temptations (248).
In spite of myriad extraliterary factors, whoever retranslates the novel will undoubtedly confront formidable challenges and will need to grapple with the historical, cultural, linguistic, lexical, stylistic, and syntactic eccentricities present in Grande sertao: veredas that de Onis and Taylor suppressed in The Devil to Pay in the Backlands.
The author retranslates carpe diem as 'taste the day,' reminding the reader to live and savor without looking back with nostalgia or hoping in vain for a future which may never happen.