reunification

(redirected from reunifications)
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re·u·ni·fy

 (rē-yo͞o′nə-fī′)
tr.v. re·u·ni·fied, re·u·ni·fy·ing, re·u·ni·fies
To cause (a group, party, state, or sect) to become unified again after being divided.

re·u′ni·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reunification - the act of coming together again; "monetary unification precipitated the reunification of the German state in October 1990"
jointure, uniting, unification, conjugation, union - the act of making or becoming a single unit; "the union of opposing factions"; "he looked forward to the unification of his family for the holidays"
homecoming - an annual school or university reunion for graduates
Translations

reunification

[ˈriːˌjuːnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] Nreunificación f

reunification

[ˌriːjuːnɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] n [country, city] → réunification f

reunification

reunification

[ˌriːjuːnɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] nriunificazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Both reunifications of the SPLM party and the national dialogue are good ideas, but their timing is wrong.
The SPLM political detainees (FDS), and SPLM in Government (SPLM-IG) holds to views of achieving peace through the reunification of the SPLM party, and through the national dialogue.
For successful reunifications to occur, parents with mental
Reunification Services Tailored to Each Family's Needs
Its confirmation of previous disappointing findings regarding the low rates of successful reunifications suggests that further studies are likely to confirm similar findings, possibly due to the fact that policies and practices remain largely the same.
Achieving Successful Returns from Care: What makes reunification work?
The child's AFDC eligibility (Courtney, 1995), and the parent's inappropriate use of discipline, fewer parenting skills, and non-utilization of drug treatment, are associated with failed reunifications (Miller, Fisher, Fetrow, and Jordan, 2005; Courtney, 1995).
This article details two provisions of the law, concurrent planning and reunification exception, and explores challenges in their implementation.
The impact of parental substance abuse on the stability of family reunifications from foster care'
This study examined the likelihood of reentry into foster care following reunification for children whose primary caretakers were stratified into groups based on the type of substance abuse cited as a primary reason for the initial removal: those with alcohol only involvement, those with drug only involvement, those with both alcohol and other drug involvement, and those with no alcohol or drug involvement.
Using event history analysis, this US study examines the relationship between reunification and re-entry rates for 33 Oklahoma counties with 100 or more reunifications occurring in 2002.
Among the variables found to significantly differentiate between failed and successful reunifications were parental use of substance abuse treatment, child use of special educational services, child use of individual, family or group therapy, overall parenting skill level, appropriate use of discipline and quality of neighbourhood.