revealed religion


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Related to revealed religion: Natural religion

re·vealed religion

(rĭ-vēld′)
n.
A religion founded on belief in divine revelation.

revealed religion

n
1. (Theology) religion based on the revelation by God to man of ideas that he would not have arrived at by his natural reason alone
2. (Theology) religion in which the existence of God depends on revelation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revealed religion - a religion founded primarily on the revelations of God to humankind
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
Translations

revealed religion

n (Rel) → Offenbarungsreligion f
References in classic literature ?
I thought it was only in revealed religion that a mistranslation improved the sense.
On the side of the moral, we have certain justification for belief in the utterances of revealed religion.
1] Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion, defender of the Oxford movement, and Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
It is my analysis of the documents found in the Coptic monasteries of Syria and Egypt, a work which will cut deep at the very foundation of revealed religion.
The qualification "in its highest mission" should be added, for that mission is taken over by revealed religion and the state, but art still has its future in them.
draws on the Oxford University Sermons, especially the great second sermon, "The Influence of Natural and Revealed Religion Respectively.
Religious Muslims - like any other religious people belonging to any revealed religion - don't feel comfortable in deliberately disobeying God
That's why revealed religion provides us with a unique ability to unconditionally accept what has traditionally been taught and avoid even the slightest prospect of any other viewpoint or interpretation.
The sections deal with separate aspects of his life and work, especially sex and revealed religion.
In a discussion of Coleridge's Lectures on Revealed Religion (1795), which he claims is the "lost" book on Pantisocracy, Wright argues that both the radical eschewing of private property proposed in Coleridge's ill-fated plan to found a utopia in America and his early Unitarian denial of the divinity of Jesus are based primarily in scripture, and secondarily in reason, though of course Coleridge spent much of his life attempting to reconcile the two.
Rather, we recognize that monogamous heterosexual marriage developed because of psychology, biology, human nature and Judeo-Christian revealed religion.
His principal concern, however, is with the growth in virtue and awareness that is available to men and women who enter into a relationship honoured by both natural law and revealed religion.