revealment


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re·veal 1

 (rĭ-vēl′)
tr.v. re·vealed, re·veal·ing, re·veals
1.
a. To make known (something concealed or unknown): She revealed that she was pregnant. The study revealed the toxic effects of the pollutant.
b. To cause to be seen; show: The curtains parted, revealing a ballerina. The x-ray revealed a broken bone.
2. To make known by supernatural or divine means: "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (Romans 1:18).
n.
The making known of an important, secret, or salient occurrence, such as the revealing of a major development, plot twist, or visual effect in a movie: "Seeing [the Wiz] in human form in the first act diminishes the power of the reveal in the second" (Bob Verini).

[Middle English revelen, from Old French reveler, from Latin revēlāre : re-, re- + vēlāre, to cover (from vēlum, veil).]

re·veal′a·ble adj.
re·veal′er n.
re·veal′ment n.

re·veal 2

 (rĭ-vēl′)
n.
1.
a. The part of the side of a window or door opening that is between the outer surface of a wall and the window or door frame.
b. The whole side of such an opening; the jamb.
2. The framework of a motor vehicle window.

[From Middle English revalen, to lower, from Old French revaler : re-, re- + avaler, to lower (from a val, down : a, to from Latin ad; see ad- + val, valley; see vale1).]

re•veal•ment

(rɪˈvil mənt)

n.
the act of revealing.
[1575–85]
References in classic literature ?
when circumstances make the revealment of it eligible.
I turned as I had been bid, expecting such a treat as only the revealment of divine glory to mortal eyes might produce.
The race of blacks that for ages had worshiped Issus, the false deity of Mars, had been left in a state of chaos by my revealment of her as naught more than a wicked old woman.