reverberation


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Related to reverberation: Reverberation time, Reflection of sound

re·ver·ber·a·tion

 (rĭ-vûr′bə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of reverberating.
b. The condition of being reverberated.
2.
a. Something reverberated.
b. An echolike force or effect; a repercussion: Reverberations from the stock market crash were still being felt months later.

re•ver•ber•a•tion

(rɪˌvɜr bəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a reechoed sound.
2. the fact of being reverberated or reflected.
3. something that is reverberated.
4. an act or instance of reverberating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverberation - the repetition of a sound resulting from reflection of the sound wavesreverberation - the repetition of a sound resulting from reflection of the sound waves; "she could hear echoes of her own footsteps"
reflectivity, reflexion, reflection - the ability to reflect beams or rays
re-echo - the echo of an echo
2.reverberation - a remote or indirect consequence of some action; "his declaration had unforeseen repercussions"; "reverberations of the market crash were felt years later"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"

reverberation

noun
1. (usually plural) consequence, result, effect, event, outcome, repercussion, end result, upshot The statement is likely to have strong reverberations.
2. echo, ringing, resonance, resounding, vibration, re-echoing He heard the reverberation of the slammed door.

reverberation

noun
Repetition of sound via reflection from a surface:
Translations

reverberation

[rɪˌvɜːbəˈreɪʃən] N
1. [of sound] → retumbo m, eco m
2. reverberations (fig) [of news, protests etc] → consecuencias fpl
3. [of light] → reverberación f

reverberation

[rɪˌvɜːrbəˈreɪʃən]
n
[sound] → réverbération f
[light] → réverbération f
reverberations npl (= repercussions) [event, news] → répercussions fpl

reverberation

n (of sound)Widerhall m, → Nachhall m; (of light, heat)Zurückstrahlen nt, → Reflexion f

reverberation

[rɪˌvɜːbəˈreɪʃn] (frm) n (see vb) → rimbombo, ripercussione f
References in classic literature ?
One subject, indeed, is but the reverberation of the other.
No severe or prolonged bodily illness followed this incident of the red-room; it only gave my nerves a shock of which I feel the reverberation to this day.
No sooner had these syllables passed my lips, than--as if a shield of brass had indeed, at the moment, fallen heavily upon a floor of silver--I became aware of a distinct, hollow, metallic, and clangorous, yet apparently muffled reverberation.
A field-piece was then discharged from the top of a neighboring hill, and gave birth to one long reverberation, which ran round the circle of mountains in an unbroken chain of sound and rolled away without a separate echo.
And when the ringing voice ceased, there was just such a reverberation as you may have heard within a great church bell, for a moment or two after the stroke of the hammer.
No sooner had the reverberation of my blows sunk into silence, than I was answered by a voice from within the tomb
Urbain uttered two words which Newman but half heard, but of which the sense came to him as it were in the reverberation of the sound, "Le miserable
No matter what Feathertop said, his words found depth and reverberation in her ear; no matter what he did, his action was heroic to her eye.
Jeffrey Aspern had never been in it that I knew of; but some note of his voice seemed to abide there by a roundabout implication, a faint reverberation.
He was walking across the lawn toward the landing stage on the river, and still felt all around him, under the dome of golden evening, an Old World savor and reverberation in that riverhaunted garden.
That this might be accomplished within the day was the explanation of the reverberation occurring so soon after midnight, the aim of the carters being to reach the door of the outgoing households by six o'clock, when the loading of their movables at once began.
When he dines alone in chambers, as he has dined to-day, and has his bit of fish and his steak or chicken brought in from the coffee-house, he descends with a candle to the echoing regions below the deserted mansion, and heralded by a remote reverberation of thundering doors, comes gravely back encircled by an earthy atmosphere and carrying a bottle from which he pours a radiant nectar, two score and ten years old, that blushes in the glass to find itself so famous and fills the whole room with the fragrance of southern grapes.