reverie

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Related to reveries: debauchee, badgered, Sophisms

rev·er·ie

 (rĕv′ə-rē)
n.
1. A state of abstracted musing; daydreaming.
2. A daydream: "I felt caught up in a reverie of years long past" (William Styron).

[Middle English, revelry, from Old French, from rever, to dream.]

reverie

(ˈrɛvərɪ) or

revery

n, pl -eries
1. an act or state of absent-minded daydreaming: to fall into a reverie.
2. (Music, other) a piece of instrumental music suggestive of a daydream
3. archaic a fanciful or visionary notion; daydream
[C14: from Old French resverie wildness, from resver to behave wildly, of uncertain origin; see rave1]

rev•er•ie

(ˈrɛv ə ri)

n.
1. a state of meditation or fanciful musing: lost in reverie.
2. a daydream.
3. a fantastic, visionary, or impractical idea.
[1325–75; < Old French reverie, derivative of rever to speak wildly]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reverie - absentminded dreaming while awakereverie - absentminded dreaming while awake  
dreaming, dream - imaginative thoughts indulged in while awake; "he lives in a dream that has nothing to do with reality"
2.reverie - an abstracted state of absorption
abstractedness, abstraction - preoccupation with something to the exclusion of all else
dream - a state of mind characterized by abstraction and release from reality; "he went about his work as if in a dream"
brown study - a state of deep absorption or thoughtfulness

reverie

noun daydream, musing, preoccupation, trance, abstraction, daydreaming, inattention, absent-mindedness, brown study, woolgathering, castles in the air or Spain The voice brought him out of his reverie.

reverie

noun
1. The condition of being so lost in solitary thought as to be unaware of one's surroundings:
2. An illusory mental image:
Translations
أحْلام اليَقْظَهحُلْم لذيذ
sněnísnění s otevřenýma očima
dagdrøm
álmodozás
dagdraumar
svajingumassvajos mintys
fantāzijasapņainībasapnis
sny

reverie

[ˈrevərɪ] Nensueño m
to be lost in reverieestar absorto, estar ensimismado

reverie

[ˈrɛvəri] nrêverie f

reverie

n (liter)Träumereien pl; he drifted off into a reverieer verfiel ins Träumen

reverie

[ˈrɛvərɪ] nfantasticheria

reverie

(ˈrevəri) noun
1. a state of pleasant dreamy thought. He was lost in reverie.
2. (usually in plural) a day-dream. pleasant reveries.
References in classic literature ?
As the word `brotherly' passed through his mind in one of his reveries, he smiled, and glanced up at the picture of Mozart that was before him.
Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries.
Fireside Reveries, Grant as a Soldier, Reflections on the Life of P.
She falls into long reveries, and does not hear a word of what is going on around.
From this summary of what has taken place in other countries, whose situations have borne the nearest resemblance to our own, what reason can we have to confide in those reveries which would seduce us into an expectation of peace and cordiality between the members of the present confederacy, in a state of separation?
For me at least--in the circumstances then surrounding me--there arose out of the pure abstractions which the hypochondriac contrived to throw upon his canvas, an intensity of intolerable awe, no shadow of which felt I ever yet in the contemplation of the certainly glowing yet too concrete reveries of Fuseli.
As to the sentiment which this journey might have awakened in him, there was clearly no trace of such a thing; while poor Passepartout existed in perpetual reveries.
The curtains were half drawn, and only admitted the mysterious light calculated for beatific reveries.
Sometimes he would fall into long reveries, sigh heavily and involuntarily, then suddenly rise, and, with folded arms, begin pacing the confined space of his dungeon.
Anne dropped her head and fell into one of those reveries so habitual with her.
In those strange old times, when fantastic dreams and madmen's reveries were realized among the actual circumstances of life, two persons met together at an appointed hour and place.
He came back to reality, after such reveries, with a somewhat muffled shock; he had begun to feel the need of accepting the unchangeable.