revere

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re·vere 1

 (rĭ-vîr′)
tr.v. re·vered, re·ver·ing, re·veres
To regard with awe, deference, and devotion.

[French révérer, from Old French reverer, from Latin reverērī : re-, re- + verērī, to respect; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: revere1, worship, venerate, adore, idolize
These verbs mean to regard with deep respect, deference, and admiration. Revere suggests awe coupled with profound honor: "At least one third of the population ... reveres every sort of holy man" (Rudyard Kipling).
Worship connotes an often uncritical devotion: "[The shortstop] was universally worshipped by fans from the first day he came to Boston" (Dan Shaughnessy).
Venerate connotes reverence accorded by virtue especially of dignity or age: "I venerate the memory of my grandfather" (Horace Walpole).
To adore is to worship with deep, often rapturous love: The students adored their caring teacher. Idolize implies regard like that accorded an object of religious devotion: a general who was idolized by his troops.

re·vere 2

 (rĭ-vîr′, -vâr′)
n.
Variant of revers.

Revere

(rɪˈvɪə)
n
(Biography) Paul. 1735–1818, American patriot and silversmith, best known for his night ride on April 18, 1775, to warn the Massachusetts colonists of the coming of the British troops

Revere

(rɪˈvɪə)
n
(Biography) Paul. 1735–1818, American patriot and silversmith, best known for his night ride on April 18, 1775, to warn the Massachusetts colonists of the coming of the British troops

re•vere1

(rɪˈvɪər)

v.t. -vered, -ver•ing.
to regard with respect tinged with awe; venerate.
[1655–65; < Latin reverērī=re- re- + verērī to stand in awe of, fear, feel reverence]
re•ver′a•ble, adj.

re•vere2

(rɪˈvɪər)

n.

Re•vere

(rɪˈvɪər)

n.
1. Paul, 1735–1818, American silversmith and patriot.
2. a city in E Massachusetts, on Massachusetts Bay, near Boston: seaside resort. 42,423.

revere


Past participle: revered
Gerund: revering

Imperative
revere
revere
Present
I revere
you revere
he/she/it reveres
we revere
you revere
they revere
Preterite
I revered
you revered
he/she/it revered
we revered
you revered
they revered
Present Continuous
I am revering
you are revering
he/she/it is revering
we are revering
you are revering
they are revering
Present Perfect
I have revered
you have revered
he/she/it has revered
we have revered
you have revered
they have revered
Past Continuous
I was revering
you were revering
he/she/it was revering
we were revering
you were revering
they were revering
Past Perfect
I had revered
you had revered
he/she/it had revered
we had revered
you had revered
they had revered
Future
I will revere
you will revere
he/she/it will revere
we will revere
you will revere
they will revere
Future Perfect
I will have revered
you will have revered
he/she/it will have revered
we will have revered
you will have revered
they will have revered
Future Continuous
I will be revering
you will be revering
he/she/it will be revering
we will be revering
you will be revering
they will be revering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been revering
you have been revering
he/she/it has been revering
we have been revering
you have been revering
they have been revering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been revering
you will have been revering
he/she/it will have been revering
we will have been revering
you will have been revering
they will have been revering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been revering
you had been revering
he/she/it had been revering
we had been revering
you had been revering
they had been revering
Conditional
I would revere
you would revere
he/she/it would revere
we would revere
you would revere
they would revere
Past Conditional
I would have revered
you would have revered
he/she/it would have revered
we would have revered
you would have revered
they would have revered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revere - American silversmith remembered for his midnight ride (celebrated in a poem by Longfellow) to warn the colonists in Lexington and Concord that British troops were coming (1735-1818)Revere - American silversmith remembered for his midnight ride (celebrated in a poem by Longfellow) to warn the colonists in Lexington and Concord that British troops were coming (1735-1818)
2.revere - a lapel on a woman's garment; turned back to show the reverse side
lapel - lap at the front of a coat; continuation of the coat collar
Verb1.revere - love unquestioningly and uncritically or to excess; venerate as an idol; "Many teenagers idolized the Beatles"
adore - love intensely; "he just adored his wife"
drool over, slobber over - envy without restraint
2.revere - regard with feelings of respect and reverencerevere - regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of; "Fear God as your father"; "We venerate genius"
esteem, respect, value, prise, prize - regard highly; think much of; "I respect his judgement"; "We prize his creativity"
saint, enshrine - hold sacred
worship - show devotion to (a deity); "Many Hindus worship Shiva"

revere

verb be in awe of, respect, honour, worship, adore, reverence, exalt, look up to, defer to, venerate, have a high opinion of, put on a pedestal, think highly of Those who support him revere him.
despise, scorn, deride, sneer at, hold in contempt

revere

verb
To regard with great awe and devotion:
Translations
يُوَقِّر، يَبَجِّل
ctít
bera mikla virîingu fyrir
didelė pagarbagarbusislabai gerbti
cienītgodāt
büyük saygı duymak

revere

[rɪˈvɪəʳ] VTvenerar
a revered figureuna figura venerada

revere

[rɪˈvɪər] vtvénérer, révérer

revere

vtverehren

revere

[rɪˈvɪəʳ] vt (frm) → venerare

revere

(rəˈviə) verb
to feel or show great respect for. The students revere the professor.
reverence (ˈrevərəns) noun
great respect. He was held in reverence by those who worked for him.
Reverend (ˈrevərənd) noun
(usually abbreviated to Rev. when written) a title given to a clergyman. (the) Rev. John Brown.
reverent (ˈrevərənt) adjective
showing great respect. A reverent silence followed the professor's lecture.
ˈreverently adverb
References in classic literature ?
You, a man who should have been Regius Professor at a great University with a thousand students all revering you.
Thus revering the soul, and learning, as the ancient said, that "its beauty is immense," man will come to see that the world is the perennial miracle which the soul worketh, and be less astonished at particular wonders; he will learn that there is no profane history; that all history is sacred; that the universe is represented in an atom, in a moment of time.
The religion of the Dodsons consisted in revering whatever was customary and respectable; it was necessary to be baptized, else one could not be buried in the church-yard, and to take the sacrament before death, as a security against more dimly understood perils; but it was of equal necessity to have the proper pall-bearers and well-cured hams at one's funeral, and to leave an unimpeachable will.