reversion


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re·ver·sion

 (rĭ-vûr′zhən)
n.
1. A return to a former condition, belief, or interest.
2. A turning away or in the opposite direction; a reversal.
3. Genetics A return to the normal phenotype, usually by a second mutation.
4. Law
a. The return of an estate to the grantor or to the grantor's heirs or successor after the grant has expired.
b. The estate thus returned.
c. The right to succeed to such an estate.

reversion

(rɪˈvɜːʃən)
n
1. a return to or towards an earlier condition, practice, or belief; act of reverting
2. the act of reversing or the state of being reversed; reversal
3. (Biology) biology
a. the return of individuals, organs, etc, to a more primitive condition or type
b. the reappearance of primitive characteristics in an individual or group
4. (Law) property law
a. an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor or his heirs at the end of a period, esp at the end of the life of a grantee
b. an estate so reverting
c. the right to succeed to such an estate
5. (Insurance) the benefit payable on the death of a life-insurance policyholder
reˈversionally adv
reˈversionary, reˈversional adj

re•ver•sion

(rɪˈvɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. the act of reverting; return to a former practice, belief, condition, etc.
2. the act of reversing or the state of being reversed; reversal.
3.
a. reappearance of ancestral characteristics that have been absent in intervening generations.
b. return to an earlier or primitive type; atavism.
4.
a. the returning of an estate, property, etc., to the grantor at the expiration of a grant.
b. the estate that so returns.
c. the right of succeeding to an estate.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin reversiō turning back, return. See revert, -tion]
re•ver′sion•ar`y (-ʒəˌnɛr i) re•ver′sion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reversion - (law) an interest in an estate that reverts to the grantor (or his heirs) at the end of some period (e.g., the death of the grantee)
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
stake, interest - (law) a right or legal share of something; a financial involvement with something; "they have interests all over the world"; "a stake in the company's future"
escheat - a reversion to the state (as the ultimate owner of property) in the absence of legal heirs
2.reversion - (genetics) a return to a normal phenotype (usually resulting from a second mutation)
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
chromosomal mutation, genetic mutation, mutation - (genetics) any event that changes genetic structure; any alteration in the inherited nucleic acid sequence of the genotype of an organism
3.reversion - a reappearance of an earlier characteristic
recurrence, return - happening again (especially at regular intervals); "the return of spring"
4.reversion - turning in the opposite directionreversion - turning in the opposite direction  
change of direction, reorientation - the act of changing the direction in which something is oriented
about turn, about-face - act of pivoting 180 degrees, especially in a military formation
u-turn - complete reversal of direction of travel
5.reversion - returning to a former state
reversal - a change from one state to the opposite state; "there was a reversal of autonomic function"
6.reversion - a failure to maintain a higher statereversion - a failure to maintain a higher state
failure - an act that fails; "his failure to pass the test"
recidivism - habitual relapse into crime

reversion

noun
A return to a former, usually worse condition:
Translations
رُجوع، إرْتِداد
obrat
tilbagevenden
afturhvarf
dönmedönüş

reversion

[rɪˈvɜːʃən] N (also Bio, Jur) → reversión f
reversion to typereversión f al tipo, salto m atrás

reversion

n
(= return to former state: of person) → Umkehr f(to zu); (to bad state) → Rückfall m (→ to in +acc); the reversion of this country to a republicdie Rückverwandlung dieses Landes in eine Republik; reversion to type (Biol) → (Arten)rückschlag m; his reversion to typedas erneute Durchbrechen seiner alten Natur
(Jur, of property) → Zurückfallen nt (→ to an +acc)

reversion

[rɪˈvɜːʃn] n (return to previous state) → ritorno (Bio) → reversione f

revert

(rəˈvəːt) verb
to come or go back (to a previous state, point in a discussion etc).
reˈversion (-ʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
References in classic literature ?
An appeal will not lie," he thought, with an absurd reversion to professional slang, making the situation more horrible, as the fire of a cigar might light up a tomb.
In many cases we do not know what the aboriginal stock was, and so could not tell whether or not nearly perfect reversion had ensued.
To such a degree, I assure you, though I would not say so to others, that if the queen, acknowledging the injuries she has done me, would recall my mother and give me the reversion of the admiralty, which belonged to my father and was promised me at his death, well
If that were at an end, the States which made the cession, on a principle of federal compromise, would be apt when the motive of the grant had ceased, to reclaim the lands as a reversion.
He was really a reversion to an earlier type, and his place was with the Tree People rather than with us who were in the process of becoming men.
His will took no notice of my father or my mother; but he left to my sister (always supposed to be his favorite in the family) a most extraordin ary legacy of possible pin-money, in the shape of a contingent reversion to the sum of three thousand pounds, payable on the death of Lady Malkinshaw, provided I survived her.
In great families, when an advantageous place cannot be obtained, either in possession, reversion, remainder, or expectancy, for the young man who is growing up, it is a very general custom to send him to sea.
She was indeed, as her fellow Martian had said of her, an atavism; a dear and precious reversion to a former type of loved and loving ancestor.
Tom Bertram must have been thought pleasant, indeed, at any rate; he was the sort of young man to be generally liked, his agreeableness was of the kind to be oftener found agreeable than some endowments of a higher stamp, for he had easy manners, excellent spirits, a large acquaintance, and a great deal to say; and the reversion of Mansfield Park, and a baronetcy, did no harm to all this.
He wondered whether he could raise money on the reversion.
Nothing was wanting to enable him to enter upon the immediate execution of this plan, but the death of Mr Allworthy; in calculating which he had employed much of his own algebra, besides purchasing every book extant that treats of the value of lives, reversions, &c.
Beginning in Boston, they were continued in a Boston suburb, on the shores of Lake George, in a Western New York health resort, in Buffalo, in Nahant; once, twice, and thrice in New York, with reversions to Boston, and summer excursions to the hills and waters of New England, until it seemed that their author had at last said his say, and he voluntarily lapsed into silence with the applause of friends and enemies alike.