revert


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re·vert

 (rĭ-vûrt′)
v. re·vert·ed, re·vert·ing, re·verts
v.intr.
1.
a. To go back to a former condition, practice, subject, or belief: a meadow reverting to forest; a reformed shoplifter reverting to old habits; a speaker reverting to her opening remarks.
b. To resume using something that has been disused: had to revert to the typewriter when the computer failed.
2. Law To be returned to the former owner or to the former owner's heirs. Used of money or property.
3. Genetics To undergo reversion.
4. Chiefly South Asian To reply.
v.tr.
1. To cause to go back to a former condition, practice, subject, or belief: "The doctor was reverted to the rank of Assistant Surgeon" (George Orwell).
2. Law To return (an estate, for example) to the grantor or the grantor's heirs or successor.

[Middle English reverten, from Old French revertir, from Vulgar Latin *revertīre, variant of Latin revertere : re-, re- + vertere, to turn; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

re·vert′er n.
re·vert′i·ble adj.
re·ver′tive adj.

revert

vb
1. to go back to a former practice, condition, belief, etc: she reverted to her old wicked ways.
2. to take up again or come back to a former topic
3. (Biology) biology (of individuals, organs, etc) to return to a more primitive, earlier, or simpler condition or type
4. US to reply to someone: we will revert to you with pricing and other details.
5. (Law) property law (of an estate or interest in land) to return to its former owner or his heirs when a grant, esp a grant for the lifetime of the grantee, comes to an end
6. revert to type to resume characteristics that were thought to have disappeared
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who, having been converted, has returned to his former beliefs or Church
[C13: from Latin revertere to return, from re- + vertere to turn]
reˈverter n
reˈvertible adj
Usage: Since back is part of the meaning of revert, one should not say that someone reverts back to a certain type of behaviour

re•vert

(rɪˈvɜrt)

v.i.
1. to return to a former habit, practice, belief, condition, etc.
2. to return to the former owner or that person's heirs.
3. to return to an ancestral type or characteristic.
4. to go back in thought or discussion: He kept reverting to his childhood.
n.
5. a person or thing that reverts.
[1250–1300; (< Old French revertir) < Latin revertere to turn back =re- re- + vertere to turn; compare verse]
re•vert′er, n.
re•vert′i•ble, adj.
re•vert`i•bil′i•ty, n.

revert


Past participle: reverted
Gerund: reverting

Imperative
revert
revert
Present
I revert
you revert
he/she/it reverts
we revert
you revert
they revert
Preterite
I reverted
you reverted
he/she/it reverted
we reverted
you reverted
they reverted
Present Continuous
I am reverting
you are reverting
he/she/it is reverting
we are reverting
you are reverting
they are reverting
Present Perfect
I have reverted
you have reverted
he/she/it has reverted
we have reverted
you have reverted
they have reverted
Past Continuous
I was reverting
you were reverting
he/she/it was reverting
we were reverting
you were reverting
they were reverting
Past Perfect
I had reverted
you had reverted
he/she/it had reverted
we had reverted
you had reverted
they had reverted
Future
I will revert
you will revert
he/she/it will revert
we will revert
you will revert
they will revert
Future Perfect
I will have reverted
you will have reverted
he/she/it will have reverted
we will have reverted
you will have reverted
they will have reverted
Future Continuous
I will be reverting
you will be reverting
he/she/it will be reverting
we will be reverting
you will be reverting
they will be reverting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been reverting
you have been reverting
he/she/it has been reverting
we have been reverting
you have been reverting
they have been reverting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been reverting
you will have been reverting
he/she/it will have been reverting
we will have been reverting
you will have been reverting
they will have been reverting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been reverting
you had been reverting
he/she/it had been reverting
we had been reverting
you had been reverting
they had been reverting
Conditional
I would revert
you would revert
he/she/it would revert
we would revert
you would revert
they would revert
Past Conditional
I would have reverted
you would have reverted
he/she/it would have reverted
we would have reverted
you would have reverted
they would have reverted

revert

Where stems of a variegated plant change to produce plain green leaves.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.revert - go back to a previous state; "We reverted to the old rules"
recidivate, relapse, retrogress, regress, lapse, fall back - go back to bad behavior; "Those who recidivate are often minor criminals"
change by reversal, reverse, turn - change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern"
resile - return to the original position or state after being stretched or compressed; "The rubber tubes resile"
recuperate, go back, recover - regain a former condition after a financial loss; "We expect the stocks to recover to $2.90"; "The company managed to recuperate"
2.revert - undergo reversion, as in a mutation
mutate - undergo mutation; "cells mutate"

revert

verb
1. go back, return, come back, resume, lapse, recur, relapse, regress, backslide, take up where you left off He reverted to smoking heavily.
2. return, go back to, be returned to, be once again in the possession of The property reverts to the freeholder.

revert

verb
1. To come back to a former condition:
2. To slip from a higher or better condition to a former, usually lower or poorer one:
Translations
يُعيد الوَضْع إلى ما كانَ عَلَيْه
vrátit se
käännynnäinenkääntyjäpalaajapalatapalauttaa
taka aftur upp, snúa sér aftur aî
grįžti įpasukti atgal prie
atgriezties pie iepriekšējā
dönmekdönüş yapmak

revert

[rɪˈvɜːt] VI
1. (= return) → volver
to revert to a subjectvolver a un tema
reverting to the matter under discussionvolviendo al tema de la discusión ...
2. (Jur) → revertir (to a)
3. (Bio) → saltar atrás
to revert to type (Bio) → saltar atrás en la cadena natural (fig) → volver por donde solía, volver a ser el mismo/la misma de antes

revert

[rɪˈvɜːrt] vi
(= return) to revert to sth → revenir à qch
to revert to childhood → revenir en enfance, retourner en enfance
to revert to one's old ways → revenir à ses vieilles habitudes
She reverted to her old ways → Elle est revenue à ses vieilles habitudes.
to revert to doing sth → se remettre à faire qch
to revert to type (= behave as one would expect) [person]
He reverted to type → Le naturel est revenu au galop. (BIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY)subir une réversion
(= be returned) to revert to sb [property, rights, money] → revenir à qn

revert

vi (= return, to former state) → zurückkehren (to zu); (to bad state) → zurückfallen (→ to in +acc); (to topic) → zurückkommen (→ to auf +acc); (to a dialect etc) → (zurück)verfallen (→ to in +acc); (Jur: property) → zurückfallen (→ to an +acc); he has reverted back to childhooder ist wieder ins Kindheitsalter zurückgefallen; to revert to type (Biol) → in der Art zurückschlagen; he has reverted to type (fig)seine alte Natur ist wieder durchgebrochen; fields reverting to moorland/woodlandFelder, die wieder versumpfen/wieder zu Wäldern werden

revert

[rɪˈvɜːt] vi (gen) to revert (to)ritornare (a)
to revert to type (Bio) → ritornare allo stato primitivo (fig) → tornare alla propria natura

revert

(rəˈvəːt) verb
to come or go back (to a previous state, point in a discussion etc).
reˈversion (-ʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
References in classic literature ?
In order that the circumstances may be clearly understood, I must revert for a moment to the period before the assault, and to the stories current in our camp of the treasure in jewels and gold stored up in the Palace of Seringapatam.
Besides, he that clears at once will relapse; for finding himself out of straits, he will revert to his custom: but he that cleareth by degrees, induceth a habit of frugality, and gaineth as well upon his mind, as upon his estate.
It is not surprising, therefore, to find that from the first the Boeotian school is forced to season its matter with romantic episodes, and that later it tends more and more to revert (as in the "Shield of Heracles") to the Homeric tradition.
Having alluded to the subject of reversion, I may here refer to a statement often made by naturalists--namely, that our domestic varieties, when run wild, gradually but certainly revert in character to their aboriginal stocks.
The laws governing inheritance are quite unknown; no one can say why the same peculiarity in different individuals of the same species, and in individuals of different species, is sometimes inherited and sometimes not so; why the child often reverts in certain characters to its grandfather or grandmother or other much more remote ancestor; why a peculiarity is often transmitted from one sex to both sexes or to one sex alone, more commonly but not exclusively to the like sex.
I believe (if the case here supposed really happens) that the money must revert to the testator's estate.
Timothy's hold on life, as you may have apprehended, was ever of the slightest, and I suppose I always knew that he must soon revert to the obscure.
Then he would suddenly revert to the matter of the food I withheld from him, praying, begging, weeping, at last threatening.
It may be easily imagined how the relationship between Aramis and a seamstress who called the queen her sister amuse the young men; but Aramis, after having blushed two or three times up to the whites of his eyes at the gross pleasantry of Porthos, begged his friends not to revert to the subject again, declaring that if a single word more was said to him about it, he would never again implore his cousins to interfere in such affairs.
I suppose it is that when we are happy the mind reverts instinctively to those with whom formerly we shared our exaltations and depressions, and je t'eu ai trop dit, dans le bon temps, mon gros Prosper, and you always listened to me too imperturbably, with your pipe in your mouth, your waistcoat unbuttoned, for me not to feel that I can count upon your sympathy to-day.
In the letter to Mr Malema and the attorneys of the EFF, Ms Mbete said she was currently consulting on the request to reschedule the motion and would revert after this.
Swazuri said the commission will follow due legal procedures to revert the land to the residents adding that they have received complaints of grabbers who have invaded the land.