revival


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re·viv·al

 (rĭ-vī′vəl)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of reviving: the revival of a person who fainted.
b. The condition of being revived.
2. A restoration to use, acceptance, activity, or vigor after a period of obscurity or quiescence: a revival of colonial architecture; a revival of the economy.
3. A new presentation of an old play, movie, opera, ballet, or similar production.
4.
a. A time of reawakened interest in religion.
b. A meeting or series of meetings for the purpose of reawakening religious faith, often characterized by impassioned preaching and public testimony.
5. Restoration to validity of something lapsed or set aside, such as a legal claim or status.

revival

(rɪˈvaɪvəl)
n
1. the act or an instance of reviving or the state of being revived
2. an instance of returning to life or consciousness; restoration of vigour or vitality
3. a renewed use, acceptance of, or interest in (past customs, styles, etc): a revival of learning; the Gothic revival.
4. (Theatre) a new production of a play that has not been recently performed
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a reawakening of faith or renewal of commitment to religion
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) an evangelistic meeting or service intended to effect such a reawakening in those present
7. (Law) the re-establishment of legal validity, as of a judgment, contract, etc

re•viv•al

(rɪˈvaɪ vəl)

n.
1. restoration to life, consciousness, vigor, or strength.
2. restoration to use, acceptance, or currency: the revival of old customs.
3. a new production of an old play.
4. a showing of an old motion picture.
5. a reawakening of interest in and care for religion.
6. an evangelistic service or a series of services to effect a religious awakening.
7. the act of reviving.
8. the state of being revived.
9. the reestablishment of legal force and effect.
[1645–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revival - bringing again into activity and prominence; "the revival of trade"; "a revival of a neglected play by Moliere"; "the Gothic revival in architecture"
Renaissance, Renascence, rebirth - the revival of learning and culture
regeneration - the activity of spiritual or physical renewal
resurrection - a revival from inactivity and disuse; "it produced a resurrection of hope"
resuscitation - the act of reviving a person and returning them to consciousness; "although he was apparently drowned, resuscitation was accomplished by artificial respiration"
betterment, improvement, advance - a change for the better; progress in development
2.revival - an evangelistic meeting intended to reawaken interest in religionrevival - an evangelistic meeting intended to reawaken interest in religion
mass meeting, rally - a large gathering of people intended to arouse enthusiasm

revival

revival

noun
2. A continuing after interruption:
Translations
إحياء عَمَلٍ فَنّي قَديمبَعْث ، إحْياء، إنْعاشمَرْحَلَة إحْياء
nové uvedeníobrozeníoživení
genoplivelsenyopsætningvækkelse
ébredésfeléledés
endurlífgun; endurnÿjunendursÿningendurvakning
nové uvedenieobrodenie
canlanmatekrar sahneye koymakyeniden rağbet bulma

revival

[rɪˈvaɪvəl] N
1. (= bringing back) [of custom, usage] → recuperación f; [of old ideas] → resurgimiento m
2. (= coming back) [of custom, usage] → vuelta f; [of old ideas] → renacimiento m
the Revival of Learning (Hist) → el Renacimiento
3. (from illness, faint) → reanimación f
4. (Theat) [of play] → reposición f

revival

[rɪˈvaɪvəl] n
[interest] → regain m; [economy, trade] → reprise f
(in fashion, music)regain m d'intérêt, revival m
revival in sth
the revival in classical music → le regain d'intérêt pour la musique classique, le revival de la musique classique
[faith] → renouveau m
[play] → reprise f

revival

n
(= bringing back, of custom, usage) → Wiedererwecken nt, → Wiederauflebenlassen nt; (of old ideas, affair)Wiederaufnehmen nt, → Wiederaufgreifen nt; (from faint, fatigue) → Wiederbeleben nt, → Wiederbelebung f; (of play)Wiederaufnahme f; (of law)Wiederinkrafttreten nt
(= coming back, return: of custom, old ideas etc) → Wiederaufleben nt; (from faint, fatigue) → Wiederbelebung f; there has been a revival of interest in …das Interesse an … ist wieder wach geworden or ist wieder erwacht; the dollar experienced a slight revivalder Dollar verzeichnete wieder einen leichten Aufschwung; an economic revivalein wirtschaftlicher Wiederaufschwung
(Rel) → Erweckung f; revival meetingErweckungsversammlung f

revival

[rɪˈvaɪvl] n (of person, business, play) → ripresa; (of faith, religion) → risveglio; (of custom, usage, restoration) → ripristino; (reappearance) → rinascita

revive

(rəˈvaiv) verb
1. to come, or bring, back to consciousness, strength, health etc. They attempted to revive the woman who had fainted; She soon revived; The flowers revived in water; to revive someone's hopes.
2. to come or bring back to use etc. This old custom has recently (been) revived.
reˈvival noun
1. the act of reviving or state of being revived. the revival of the invalid / of our hopes.
2. (a time of) new or increased interest in something. a religious revival.
3. (the act of producing) an old and almost forgotten play, show etc.
References in classic literature ?
It was like going to revival meetings with someone who was always being converted.
They flanked opposite ends of the house and were probably architectural absurdities, redeemed in a measure indeed by not being wholly disengaged nor of a height too pretentious, dating, in their gingerbread antiquity, from a romantic revival that was already a respectable past.
It was introduced by an old Italian publisher somewhere about the 15th century, during the Revival of Learning; and in those days, and even down to a comparatively late period, dolphins were popularly supposed to be a species of the Leviathan.
At the last place, however, there was a bartender who knew him and liked him, and let him doze at one of the tables until the boss came back; and also, as he was going out, the man gave him a tip--on the next block there was a religious revival of some sort, with preaching and singing, and hundreds of hoboes would go there for the shelter and warmth.
Well, I'd ben a-running' a little temperance revival thar 'bout a week, and was the pet of the women folks, big and little, for I was makin' it mighty warm for the rummies, I TELL you, and takin' as much as five or six dollars a night -- ten cents a head, children and niggers free -- and business a-growin' all the time, when somehow or another a little report got around last night that I had a way of puttin' in my time with a private jug on the sly.
She was horrified to think how near she had come to being guilty herself; she had been saved in the nick of time by a revival in the colored Methodist Church, a fortnight before, at which time and place she "got religion.
Jennings, though forced, on examination, to acknowledge a temporary revival, tried to keep her young friend from indulging a thought of its continuance;-- and Elinor, conning over every injunction of distrust, told herself likewise not to hope.
She was not prepared for this sudden revival of the lost associations of home.
Doctor Manette received such patients here as his old reputation, and its revival in the floating whispers of his story, brought him.
She was so unusually roused, that I was glad to compound for an affectionate hug, elicited by this revival in her mind of our old injuries, and to make the best I could of it, before Mr.
I am confident that it took no distinctness of shape, and that it was the revival for a few minutes of the terror of childhood.
Yes: there was to be, as Lord Henry had prophesied, a new Hedonism that was to recreate life and to save it from that harsh uncomely puritanism that is having, in our own day, its curious revival.