revivalism


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Related to revivalism: revivalist, Islamic revivalism

re·viv·al·ism

 (rĭ-vī′və-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The spirit or activities characteristic of religious revivals.
2. A desire or inclination to revive what belongs to an earlier time.

revivalism

(rɪˈvaɪvəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a movement, esp an evangelical Christian one, that seeks to reawaken faith
2. the tendency or desire to revive former customs, styles, etc

re•viv•al•ism

(rɪˈvaɪ vəˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the form of religious activity that manifests itself in revivals.
2. the tendency to revive the past.

revivalism

that form of religious activity that manifests itself in evangelistic services for the purpose of effecting a religious awakening. — revivalist, n. — revivalistic, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revivalism - an attempt to reawaken the evangelical faith
evangelicalism - stresses the importance of personal conversion and faith as the means of salvation
Translations
revivalisme

revivalism

[rɪˈvaɪvəˌlɪzəm] N (Rel) → evangelismo m

revivalism

n (Rel) → Erweckungsbewegung f

revivalism

[rɪˈvaɪvəˌlɪzm] n (Rel) → revivalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
uncovers the larger pattern of meanings: he convincingly adumbrates how Graham reshaped the traditional evangelical language of revivalism into a moral vocabulary that millions of Americans (evangelicals and others) used to make sense of their private lives and public commitments.
When one examines the remarkable proclivity of the Welsh to religious revivalism, and at least somewhere in Wales experienced a spiritual awakening every year between the mid-18th century and 1905, the extent to which Welsh nonconformists had a generous worldview, that could at times be global in scope, becomes readily apparent.
In recent decades, Islamic revivalism, as a very influential political factor, is playing a greater role in relations between Islam and the West.
A recurring concern seems to be the possibility that on the one hand, 'folklore' might be perceived as a static category, while on the other, acts of deliberate revivalism might have an element of 'folldorism', or artificially contrived 'fakelore', about them.
Chapter three shows how the transatlantic explosion of evangelical revivalism between 1735 and 1770 brought new opportunities and transformations in how both Blacks and Indians translated, appropriated, and indigenized Christianity.
Far more than a study of Egyptian revivalism, "Characteristically American: Memorial Architecture, National Identity, and the Egyptian Revival" examines the Egyptian style of commemoration from the rural cemetery to national obelisks to the Sphinx at Mount Auburn Cemetery.
They then consider the role of identity and social status in Romani Pentecostalism in Bulgaria, Spain, Slovakia, the UK, and Transylvania; aspects of religious life, including music, personal testimonies, the synchronization of traditional customs into worship practices, gender issues, and leaders; and Romani revivalism in South America and Turkey.
Peterson locates ecclesiology in North America within a historical narrative that runs from seventeenth century Puritanism through the eighteenth century Enlightenment and nineteenth century revivalism.
Chapter 5 explores Tanzanian revivalists who bureaucratized revivalism by applying the new tools of bookkeeping to their souls, thereby charismatizing bureaucracy (contra Weber).
PITCHED somewhere between the loose revivalism of Jack White and the groove of Alabama Shakes, Rival Sons have been quietly building up a loyal following.
More recent attempts at jukebox revivalism range from passable, Hairspray, showing on Friday, 6.
The focus of reforms and measures in the OIC should be on intellectual revivalism of all Muslims through a network of world-class universities with state-of-the-art facilities established all over the Muslim world under its umbrella.