revolution


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rev·o·lu·tion

 (rĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. Orbital motion about a point, especially as distinguished from axial rotation: the planetary revolution about the sun.
b. A turning or rotational motion about an axis.
c. A single complete cycle of such orbital or axial motion.
2. The overthrow of one government and its replacement with another.
3. A sudden or momentous change in a situation: the revolution in computer technology.
4. Geology A time of major crustal deformation, when folds and faults are formed.

[Middle English revolucioun, from Old French revolution, from Late Latin revolūtiō, revolūtiōn-, from Latin revolūtus, past participle of revolvere, to turn over; see revolve.]

revolution

(ˌrɛvəˈluːʃən)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the overthrow or repudiation of a regime or political system by the governed
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Marxist theory) the violent and historically necessary transition from one system of production in a society to the next, as from feudalism to capitalism
3. a far-reaching and drastic change, esp in ideas, methods, etc
4.
a. movement in or as if in a circle
b. one complete turn in such a circle: a turntable rotating at 33 revolutions per minute.
5. (Astronomy)
a. the orbital motion of one body, such as a planet or satellite, around another. Compare rotation5a
b. one complete turn in such motion
6. a cycle of successive events or changes
7. (Geological Science) geology obsolete a profound change in conditions over a large part of the earth's surface, esp one characterized by mountain building: an orogenic revolution.
[C14: via Old French from Late Latin revolūtiō, from Latin revolvere to revolve]

rev•o•lu•tion

(ˌrɛv əˈlu ʃən)

n.
1. a complete and forcible overthrow and replacement of an established government or political system by the people governed.
2. a sudden, complete, or radical change in something: a revolution in church architecture; a social revolution caused by automation.
3.
a. a procedure or course, as if in a circuit, back to a starting point.
b. a single turn of this kind.
4.
a. a turning round or rotating, as on an axis.
b. a moving in a circular or curving course, as about a central point.
c. a single cycle in such a course.
5.
a. the orbiting of one heavenly body around another.
b. (not in technical use) the rotation of a heavenly body on its axis.
c. a single course of such movement.
6. a cycle of events in time or in a recurring period of time.
[1350–1400; Middle English revolucion < Late Latin revolūtiō= Latin revolū-, variant s. of revolvere to roll back (see revolve) + -tiō -tion]

rev·o·lu·tion

(rĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən)
1. The motion of an object around a point, especially around another object or a center of mass.
2. A single complete cycle of such motion.
Usage We use the words revolution and rotation—or the verbs revolve and rotate—to indicate cyclic patterns. We talk of crop rotation to refer to the successive planting of different crops on the same land, or of a revolving door to refer to a door turning about a central pivot. In everyday speech revolution and rotation are often used as synonyms, but in science they are not synonyms and have distinct meanings. The difference between the two terms lies in the location of the central axis that the object turns about. If the axis is outside the body itself—that is, if the object is orbiting about another object—then one complete orbit is called a revolution. But if the object is turning about an axis that passes through itself, then one complete cycle is called a rotation. This difference is often summed up in the statement: "Earth rotates on its axis and revolves around the sun."

revolution

  • gyre - A circular movement or revolution; to cause to spin around or whirl.
  • rebellion, revolution - Rebellion is open resistance to a government or authority; revolution is a rebellion that succeeds in overthrowing the government and establishing a new one.
  • rev - An abbreviation of revolution.
  • young Turk - Term for a tyrannical or unmanageable man, based on the members of a party of Turkish agitators that brought about the revolution of 1908.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revolution - a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behavingrevolution - a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behaving; "the industrial revolution was also a cultural revolution"
alteration, change, modification - an event that occurs when something passes from one state or phase to another; "the change was intended to increase sales"; "this storm is certainly a change for the worse"; "the neighborhood had undergone few modifications since his last visit years ago"
Cultural Revolution, Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution - a radical reform in China initiated by Mao Zedong in 1965 and carried out largely by the Red Guard; intended to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the government it resulted in purges of the intellectuals and socioeconomic chaos
green revolution - the introduction of pesticides and high-yield grains and better management during the 1960s and 1970s which greatly increased agricultural productivity
2.revolution - the overthrow of a government by those who are governed
counterrevolution - a revolution whose aim is to reverse the changes introduced by a previous revolution
group action - action taken by a group of people
3.revolution - a single complete turn (axial or orbital)revolution - a single complete turn (axial or orbital); "the plane made three rotations before it crashed"; "the revolution of the earth about the sun takes one year"
turning, turn - a movement in a new direction; "the turning of the wind"
clockwise rotation, dextrorotation - rotation to the right
counterclockwise rotation, levorotation - rotation to the left
axial motion, axial rotation, roll - rotary motion of an object around its own axis; "wheels in axial rotation"
orbital motion, orbital rotation - motion of an object in an orbit around a fixed point; "satellites in orbital rotation"
spin - a swift whirling motion (usually of a missile)

revolution

noun
1. revolt, rising, coup, rebellion, uprising, mutiny, insurgency, coup d'état, putsch after the French Revolution
2. transformation, shift, innovation, upheaval, reformation, metamorphosis, sea change, drastic or radical change a revolution in ship design and propulsion
3. rotation, turn, cycle, circle, wheel, spin, lap, circuit, orbit, whirl, gyration, round The gear drives a wheel 1/10th revolution per cycle.

revolution

noun
1. Circular movement around a point or about an axis:
2. Organized opposition intended to change or overthrow existing authority:
3. A momentous or sweeping change:
Translations
ثَوْرَةثَوْرَهثَوْرَه: تَغَيُّر كامِلدَوَران الأرْض حَوْل الشَّمْس
revoluceobrátkaotáčeníotáčka
revolutiongennemgribende forandringomdrejning
vallankumous
revolucija
forradalomgyökeres átalakulás
byltingsnúningurumbylting
革命公転回転改革
혁명
apsisukimasnovatoriškaspadaryti perversmąrevoliucijarevoliucinis
apgrieziensapvērsums
revoluţie
obiehanierevolúcia
revolucija
revolution
การปฏิวัติ
cuộc cách mạng

revolution

[ˌrevəˈluːʃən] N
1. (Pol, fig) → revolución f
2. (= turn) → revolución f, vuelta f (Tech) → rotación f, giro m
revolutions per minuterevoluciones por minuto
3. (Astron) (= orbit) → revolución f; (on axis) → rotación f

revolution

[ˌrɛvəˈluːʃən] n
(= uprising) → révolution f
the French Revolution → la Révolution française
(= important change) → révolution f
a revolution in sth → une révolution dans qch
[wheel] → tour m, révolution f; [planet] → révolution f

revolution

n
(Pol, fig) → Revolution f
(= turn) (around own axis) → Umdrehung f; (of planet around sun)Umlauf m; 4,000 revolutions per minuteeine Drehzahl von 4.000 pro Minute

revolution

[ˌrɛvəˈluːʃn] n (movement, change) (Pol) → rivoluzione f; (of record, engine, wheel) → giro

revolution

(revəˈluːʃən) noun
1. (the act of making) a successful, violent attempt to change or remove a government etc. the American Revolution.
2. a complete change in ideas, methods etc. There's been a complete revolution in the way things are done in this office.
3. a complete circle or turn round a central point, axis etc (eg as made by a record turning on a record-player, or the Earth moving on its axis or round the Sun).
ˌrevoˈlutionary adjective
1. involving or causing great changes in ideas, methods etc. a revolutionary new process for making paper.
2. of a revolution against a government etc. revolutionary activities.
nounplural revoˈlutionaries
a person who takes part in, or is in favour of, (a) revolution.
ˌrevoˈlutionize, ˌrevoˈlutionise verb
to cause great changes in (ideas, methods etc). This new machinery will revolutionize the paper-making industry.

revolution

ثَوْرَة revoluce revolution Revolution επανάσταση revolución vallankumous révolution revolucija rivoluzione 革命 혁명 revolutie revolusjon rewolucja revolução революция revolution การปฏิวัติ devrim cuộc cách mạng 革命
References in classic literature ?
John saw in a minute that a revolution of some kind was going on, but wisely asked no questions, knowing that Meg was such a transparent little person, she couldn't keep a secret to save her life, and therefore the clue would soon appear.
Preserving-time was a prolonged festival, and house-cleaning was like a revolution.
The carelessness engendered by these usages descended even to the war of the Revolution and lost the States the important fortress of Ticonderoga opening a way for the army of Burgoyne into what was then the bosom of the country.
During the Revolution, the Pyncheon of that epoch, adopting the royal side, became a refugee; but repented, and made his reappearance, just at the point of time to preserve the House of the Seven Gables from confiscation.
The founders of the greater part of the families which now compose the aristocracy of Salem might here be traced, from the petty and obscure beginnings of their traffic, at periods generally much posterior to the Revolution, upward to what their children look upon as long-established rank,
I was by the strangest of chances wondering how I should meet him when the revolution unmistakably occurred.
1] In August 1791, as a consequence of the French Revolution, the black slaves and mulattoes on Haiti rose in revolt against the whites, and in the period of turmoil that followed enormous cruelties were practised by both sides.
But such was the case, they think, in the Revolution of '75.
Why, it was like reading about France and the French, before the ever memor- able and blessed Revolution, which swept a thousand years of such villany away in one swift tidal-wave of blood -- one: a settlement of that hoary debt in the proportion of half a drop of blood for each hogshead of it that had been pressed by slow tortures out of that people in the weary stretch of ten centuries of wrong and shame and misery the like of which was not to be mated but in hell.
She said that this composer had made a complete revolution in music and was burying the old masters one by one.
The greatest military genius our world ever produced was a brick-layer from somewhere back of Boston - died during the Revolution - by the name of Absalom Jones.
She took history with Alice Robinson's class, which was attacking the subject of the Revolution, while Rebecca was bidden to begin with the discovery of America.