revulsion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

re·vul·sion

 (rĭ-vŭl′shən)
n.
1. A sudden strong change or reaction in feeling, especially a feeling of violent disgust or loathing.
2. Archaic A withdrawing or turning away from something.
3. Medicine The reduction of superficial inflammation in an affected body part, as by topical agents, in order to decrease inflammation in adjacent structures.

[Latin revulsiō, revulsiōn-, from revulsus, past participle of revellere, to tear back : re-, re- + vellere, to tear.]

re·vul′sive adj.

revulsion

(rɪˈvʌlʃən)
n
1. a sudden and unpleasant violent reaction in feeling, esp one of extreme loathing
2. the act or an instance of drawing back or recoiling from something
3. (Medicine) med obsolete the diversion of disease or congestion from one part of the body to another by cupping, counterirritants, etc
[C16: from Latin revulsiō a pulling away, from revellere, from re- + vellere to pull, tear]
reˈvulsionary adj

re•vul•sion

(rɪˈvʌl ʃən)

n.
1. a strong feeling of repugnance, distaste, or dislike; disgust; loathing.
2. a sudden and violent change of feeling or response in sentiment, taste, etc.
3. the act of drawing something back or away.
[1535–45; < Latin revulsiō tearing off, derivative (with -tiō -tion) of revellere to tear loose =re- re- + vellere to pluck]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revulsion - intense aversion
disgust - strong feelings of dislike

revulsion

revulsion

noun
Translations

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃən] N
1. (= disgust) → repugnancia f, asco m (Med) → revulsión f
2. (= sudden change) → reacción f, cambio m repentino

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃən] nrévulsion f

revulsion

n
(= disgust)Abscheu m, → Ekel m (→ at vor +dat)
(= sudden change)Umschwung m; (= reaction)Empörung f

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃn] nripugnanza

re·vul·sion

n. revulsión.
References in classic literature ?
Tormented, in the hall, with difficulties and obstacles, I remember sinking down at the foot of the staircase--suddenly collapsing there on the lowest step and then, with a revulsion, recalling that it was exactly where more than a month before, in the darkness of night and just so bowed with evil things, I had seen the specter of the most horrible of women.
Upon opening my eyes then, and coming out of my own pleasant and self-created darkness into the imposed and coarse outer gloom of the unilluminated twelve-o'clock-at-night, I experienced a disagreeable revulsion.
But it is a blessed provision of nature that at times like these, as soon as a man's mercury has got down to a certain point there comes a revulsion, and he rallies.
His misery vanished, his feelings underwent a tremendous revulsion.
He had naturally repressed much, and some revulsion might have been expected in him when the occasion for repression was gone.
Before a caress has had time to cool, a strenuous revulsion seizes me: I long to return to my old lonely ascetic hermit life; to my dry books; my Socialist propagandism; my voyage of discovery through the wilderness of thought.
When he smiled she could not fear him, and now she shrank closer against him in natural revulsion toward the rough coat of the brute upon her other side.
At this point there was a revulsion in my heart too.
Some close observers, indeed, detected a feverish flush and alternate paleness of countenance, with corresponding flow and revulsion of spirits, and once or twice a painful and helpless betrayal of lassitude, as if she were on the point of sinking to the ground.
With a sudden revulsion of feeling and tactics, he determined to throw himself, at once, into the penitent and candid.
Each gust of the clouded mood that seemed warmed by the heat of a heart flaming with anger has its counterpart in the chilly blasts that seem blown from a breast turned to ice with a sudden revulsion of feeling.
So quick was the revulsion of feeling, I had not time to cheek her triumph by reproof; ere I could contract my brows to a frown she had become serious and almost mournful-looking.