revulsion

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re·vul·sion

 (rĭ-vŭl′shən)
n.
1. A sudden strong change or reaction in feeling, especially a feeling of violent disgust or loathing.
2. Archaic A withdrawing or turning away from something.
3. Medicine The reduction of superficial inflammation in an affected body part, as by topical agents, in order to decrease inflammation in adjacent structures.

[Latin revulsiō, revulsiōn-, from revulsus, past participle of revellere, to tear back : re-, re- + vellere, to tear.]

re·vul′sive adj.

revulsion

(rɪˈvʌlʃən)
n
1. a sudden and unpleasant violent reaction in feeling, esp one of extreme loathing
2. the act or an instance of drawing back or recoiling from something
3. (Medicine) med obsolete the diversion of disease or congestion from one part of the body to another by cupping, counterirritants, etc
[C16: from Latin revulsiō a pulling away, from revellere, from re- + vellere to pull, tear]
reˈvulsionary adj

re•vul•sion

(rɪˈvʌl ʃən)

n.
1. a strong feeling of repugnance, distaste, or dislike; disgust; loathing.
2. a sudden and violent change of feeling or response in sentiment, taste, etc.
3. the act of drawing something back or away.
[1535–45; < Latin revulsiō tearing off, derivative (with -tiō -tion) of revellere to tear loose =re- re- + vellere to pluck]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.revulsion - intense aversion
disgust - strong feelings of dislike

revulsion

revulsion

noun
Translations

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃən] N
1. (= disgust) → repugnancia f, asco m (Med) → revulsión f
2. (= sudden change) → reacción f, cambio m repentino

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃən] nrévulsion f

revulsion

n
(= disgust)Abscheu m, → Ekel m (→ at vor +dat)
(= sudden change)Umschwung m; (= reaction)Empörung f

revulsion

[rɪˈvʌlʃn] nripugnanza

re·vul·sion

n. revulsión.
References in classic literature ?
Whilst burning-hot napkins, physic, revulsives, and Guenaud, who was recalled, were performing their functions with increased activity, Colbert, holding his great head in both his hands, to compress within it the fever of the projects engendered by the brain, was meditating the tenor of the donation he would make Mazarin write, at the first hour of respite his disease should afford him.
The revulsives came from different online and grassroots platforms, such as No Les Votes ("Do Not Vote for Them"), an online campaign recommending not voting the major parties, in opposition to the "Ley Sinde", a bill aimed at curtailing "Internet piracy" (Postill 2014).