rewards


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

re·ward

 (rĭ-wôrd′)
n.
1. A consequence that happens to someone as a result of worthy or unworthy behavior: the rewards of exercise; the rewards of lying to your boss.
2. Money offered or given for some special service, such as the return of a lost article or the capture of a criminal.
3. A satisfying return on investment; a profit.
4. Psychology The return for performance of a desired behavior; positive reinforcement.
tr.v. re·ward·ed, re·ward·ing, re·wards
To give a reward to or for.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from rewarder, to take notice of : re-, intensive pref. (from Latin; see re- + warder, to guard, watch over, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots).]

re·ward′a·ble adj.
re·ward′er n.

rewards

(rɪˈwɔːdz)
pl n
the benefits of doing something
References in classic literature ?
Some day, he told himself, the fide of things political will turn in my favor and the years of ineffectual service count big in the bestowal of rewards.
In order to complete his victory, he was in the act of recommencing the enumeration of the rewards, when Magua made an expressive gesture and said:
Along at first I was mentally offering a reward of five--six--seven--ten--dollars for that mouse; but toward the last I was offering rewards which were entirely beyond my means.
Why, I said at the time that no thief and no thief's pal was going to try to pawn or sell a thing where he knowed the pawnbroker could get both rewards by taking HIM into camp with the swag.
However, I mentally shake hands with you for your answer, despite its inaccuracy; and as much for the manner in which it was said, as for the substance of the speech; the manner was frank and sincere; one does not often see such a manner: no, on the contrary, affectation, or coldness, or stupid, coarse-minded misapprehension of one's meaning are the usual rewards of candour.
So the cream of all human rewards is sipped in endless succession by the Fools.
Slimy gaps and causeways, winding among old wooden piles, with a sickly substance clinging to the latter, like green hair, and the rags of last year's handbills offering rewards for drowned men fluttering above high-water mark, led down through the ooze and slush to the ebb-tide.
In personal qualifications,'' he added, ``it was possible that Prince John might be inferior to his brother Richard; but when it was considered that the latter returned with the sword of vengeance in his hand, while the former held out rewards, immunities, privileges, wealth, and honours, it could not be doubted which was the king whom in wisdom the nobility were called on to support.
I answered "that our horses were trained up, from three or four years old, to the several uses we intended them for; that if any of them proved intolerably vicious, they were employed for carriages; that they were severely beaten, while they were young, for any mischievous tricks; that the males, designed for the common use of riding or draught, were generally castrated about two years after their birth, to take down their spirits, and make them more tame and gentle; that they were indeed sensible of rewards and punishments; but his honour would please to consider, that they had not the least tincture of reason, any more than the YAHOOS in this country.
O genius," I said, "you see that this Sultan was not content with merely forgiving the envious man for the attempt on his life; he heaped rewards and riches upon him.
All the neighbouring kings had offered rich rewards to anyone who should be able to destroy the monster, either by force or enchantment, and many had tried their luck, but all had miserably failed.
And here comes in at once the bestowal of rewards upon his squire and all who have aided him in rising to so exalted a rank.