rhetorical


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Related to rhetorical: rhetorical question, Rhetorical devices

rhe·tor·i·cal

 (rĭ-tôr′ĭ-kəl, -tŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to rhetoric.
2. Characterized by overelaborate or bombastic rhetoric.
3. Used for persuasive effect: a speech punctuated by rhetorical pauses.

rhe·tor′i·cal·ly adv.

rhetorical

(rɪˈtɒrɪkəl)
adj
1. concerned with effect or style rather than content or meaning; bombastic
2. (Rhetoric) of or relating to rhetoric or oratory
rheˈtorically adv

rhe•tor•i•cal

(rɪˈtɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈtɒr-)

adj.
1. used for mere effect.
2. marked by or tending to use bombast.
3. of, concerned with, or being rhetoric.
[1470–80; < Latin rhētoric(us) (< Greek rhētorikós) + -al1]
rhe•tor′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rhetorical - of or relating to rhetoric; "accepted two or three verbal and rhetorical changes I suggested"- W.A.White; "the rhetorical sin of the meaningless variation"- Lewis Mumford
2.rhetorical - given to rhetoric, emphasizing style at the expense of thought; "mere rhetorical frippery"
figurative, nonliteral - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
fancy - not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"
unrhetorical - not rhetorical

rhetorical

adjective
1. oratorical, verbal, linguistic, stylistic a rhetorical device used to emphasize moments in the text

rhetorical

adjective
1. Of or relating to the art of public speaking:
2. Characterized by language that is elevated and sometimes pompous in style:
Translations
retòric
řečnický
retorinen
retorisk

rhetorical

[rɪˈtɒrɪkəl] ADJretórico
rhetorical questionpregunta f retórica

rhetorical

[rɪˈtɒrɪkəl] adjrhétorique

rhetorical

adjrhetorisch; (pej)phrasenhaft, schwülstig (pej)

rhetorical

[rɪˈtɒrɪkl] adj (style, question) → retorico/a
References in classic literature ?
If these words had been spoken by some easy, self-indulgent exhorter, from whose mouth they might have come merely as pious and rhetorical flourish, proper to be used to people in distress, perhaps they might not have had much effect; but coming from one who daily and calmly risked fine and imprisonment for the cause of God and man, they had a weight that could not but be felt, and both the poor, desolate fugitives found calmness and strength breathing into them from it.
And the third of these speech-improving Bells, the inventor of the telephone, inherited the peculiar genius of his fathers, both inventive and rhetorical, to such a degree that as a boy he had constructed an artificial skull, from gutta-percha and India rubber, which, when enlivened by a blast of air from a hand-bellows, would actually pronounce several words in an almost human manner.
Indeed, though Indians are generally very lofty, rhetorical, and figurative in their language at all great talks, and high ceremonials, yet, if trappers and traders may be believed, they are the most unsavory vagabonds in their ordinary colloquies; they make no hesitation to call a spade a spade; and when they once undertake to call hard names, the famous pot and kettle, of vituperating memory, are not to be compared with them for scurrility of epithet.
All the chief actors being of a worldly importance, the barristers were well balanced; the prosecutor for the Crown was Sir Walter Cowdray, a heavy, but weighty advocate of the sort that knows how to seem English and trustworthy, and how to be rhetorical with reluctance.
He paused awhile, and then went on with one of those strange bursts of rhetorical eloquence that Zulus sometimes indulge in, which to my mind, full though they are of vain repetitions, show that the race is by no means devoid of poetic instinct and of intellectual power.
If I am rhetorical it is because Stroeve was rhetorical.
He leaned back cautiously, for the chair on which he sat had a ricketty leg, and it was disconcerting when a rhetorical flourish was interrupted by a sudden fall to the floor.
It was always a very rhetorical and often a trying affair, but in these progressive times you have to make a noise to get a living.
She delivered herself of an harangue in which she asked a great many rhetorical questions and answered them with a little bang of one fist upon another.
That sense of a life in natural objects, which in most poetry is but a rhetorical artifice, was, then, in Wordsworth the assertion of what was for him almost literal fact.
Others of Lyly's affectations are rhetorical questions, hosts of allusions to classical history, and literature, and an unfailing succession of similes from all the recondite knowledge that he can command, especially from the fantastic collection of fables which, coming down through the Middle Ages from the Roman writer Pliny, went at that time by the name of natural history and which we have already encountered in the medieval Bestiaries.
This volume, part of the Pragmatics & Beyond New Series, publishes a second volume (with eight papers) of presentations from a workshop on the theme, all of which seek to advance the study of texts, coherence, and rhetorical structure in their various forms.