nodule

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Related to rheumatoid nodules: rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid factor

nod·ule

 (nŏj′o͞ol)
n.
1. A small knotlike protuberance.
2. Medicine A small, abnormal but usually benign mass of tissue, as on the thyroid gland, in the lung, or under the skin.
3. Botany A small knoblike outgrowth, especially one on the roots of a leguminous plant that contains bacteria that fix nitrogen.
4. Mineralogy A small rounded lump of a mineral or mixture of minerals, usually harder than the surrounding rock or sediment.

[Middle English, from Latin nōdulus, diminutive of nōdus, knot; see ned- in Indo-European roots.]

nod′u·lar (nŏj′ə-lər), nod′u·lose′ (-lōs′), nod′u·lous (-ləs) adj.

nodule

(ˈnɒdjuːl)
n
1. a small knot, lump, or node
2. (Botany) Also called: root nodule any of the knoblike outgrowths on the roots of clover and many other legumes: contain bacteria involved in nitrogen fixation
3. (Anatomy) anatomy any small node or knoblike protuberance
4. (Geological Science) a small rounded lump of rock or mineral substance, esp in a matrix of different rock material
[C17: from Latin nōdulus, from nōdus knot]
ˈnodular, ˈnodulose, ˈnodulous adj

nod•ule

(ˈnɒdʒ ul)

n.
1. a small node, knot, or knob.
2. a small, rounded mass or lump.
[1590–1600; < Latin nōdulus=nōd(us) knot + -ulus -ule]
nod′u•lar, adj.

nod·ule

(nŏj′o͞ol)
1. Anatomy A small, usually hard mass of tissue.
2. Botany A small knob-like outgrowth found on the roots of many plants that are legumes. See more at legume.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nodule - a small nodenodule - a small node        
node - any bulge or swelling of an anatomical structure or part
2.nodule - small rounded wartlike protuberance on a plantnodule - small rounded wartlike protuberance on a plant
plant process, enation - a natural projection or outgrowth from a plant body or organ
3.nodule - (mineralogy) a small rounded lump of mineral substance (usually harder than the surrounding rock or sediment)
mineralogy - the branch of geology that studies minerals: their structure and properties and the ways of distinguishing them
geode - (mineralogy) a hollow rock or nodule with the cavity usually lined with crystals
hunk, lump - a large piece of something without definite shape; "a hunk of bread"; "a lump of coal"
Translations

nodule

[ˈnɒdjuːl] Nnódulo m

nodule

n (Med, Bot) → Knötchen nt; (Geol) → Klümpchen nt

nodule

[ˈnɒdjuːl] nnodulo

nod·ule

n. nódulo o nudo pequeño;
solitary ______ solitario;
subcutaneous ______ subcutáneo.

nodule

n nódulo
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE Differential diagnosis for dermatomally distributed nodules (4) Neoplasms Benign Syringocystadenoma papilliferum, trichoepithelioma, cutaneous schwannoma Malignant Basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous metastases, lymphoma, plasmacytoma, squamous cell carcinoma Other mucocutaneous Granuloma annulare, neurofibromatosis type 1, conditions pseudolymphoma, rheumatoid nodules, sarcoidosis, xanthomas Adapted with permission from: Hager CM, Cohen PR, Tschen JA.
Women with RA also may develop rheumatoid nodules, which feel like firm lumps, often in the hands and elbows.
They are commonly seen in the fingers and are usually smaller in size (< 5 mm in diameter) than rheumatoid nodules, though they may be clinically indistinguishable.
Rheumatoid nodules are the most prevalent extra-articular manifestation in RA patients, which may present at different locations, frequently in the finger joints and at the wrists.
Because of tenderness of multiple joints and new occurrence of rheumatoid nodules on the left knee on 16 February 2014, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) increased to 70 mm/h and C-reactive protein (CRP) 16.
Rheumatoid nodulosis refers to the presence of numerous rheumatoid nodules, usually subcutaneous, with little active sinovitis of the joints.
It is defined as an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis of the skin and/or nails with usually a negative serological test for rheumatoid factor and the absence of rheumatoid nodules.
Depending on the severity of the disease, systemic manifestations may occur including lung disease, rheumatoid nodules and cardiovascular system effects.
The 1987 criteria required radiographic evidence of erosions as well as the presence of subcutaneous rheumatoid nodules.
About one-quarter of those with RA develop rheumatoid nodules.
When considering calcified/ossified metastatic disease, the differential may include nodular amyloid, hyalinizing granulomas, and rheumatoid nodules (Figure 6).