rhizome


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rhizome
Solomon's seal rhizome

rhi·zome

 (rī′zōm′)
n.
A horizontal, usually underground stem that often sends out roots and shoots from its nodes. Also called rootstock.

[Greek rhizōma, mass of roots, from rhizoun, to cause to take root, from rhiza, root; see wrād- in Indo-European roots.]

rhi·zom′a·tous (-zŏm′ə-təs, -zō′mə-) adj.
rhi·zom′ic adj.

rhizome

(ˈraɪzəʊm)
n
(Botany) a thick horizontal underground stem of plants such as the mint and iris whose buds develop new roots and shoots. Also called: rootstock or rootstalk
[C19: from New Latin rhizoma, from Greek, from rhiza a root]
rhizomatous adj

rhi•zome

(ˈraɪ zoʊm)

n.
a rootlike underground stem, commonly horizontal in position, that usu. produces roots below and sends up shoots progressively from the upper surface.
[1835–45; < New Latin rhizoma < Greek rhízōma root, stem = rhizō-, variant s. of rhizoûn to fix firmly, take root (derivative of rhíza root1) + -ma n. suffix of result]
rhi•zom′a•tous (-ˈzɒm ə təs, -ˈzoʊ mə-) adj.
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rhizome

rhi·zome

(rī′zōm′)
A plant stem that grows horizontally under or along the ground and often sends out roots and shoots. New plants develop from the shoots. Ginger, iris, and violets have rhizomes. Also called rootstock. Compare bulb, corm, runner, tuber.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhizome - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structurerhizome - a horizontal plant stem with shoots above and roots below serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Translations
oddenek
maavarsi
rizóma

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] Nrizoma m

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] nrhizome m

rhizome

nRhizom nt, → Wurzelstock m

rhizome

[ˈraɪzəʊm] nrizoma m
References in periodicals archive ?
Bearded irises should be watered after transplanting and during extreme drought, but too much water can lead to rhizome rot Bearded irises can survive beyond the sprinkler system.
The distinguishing characters used were rhizome scales with denticulate claw-like teeth, upper surfaces of the rachises provided with clavate-glandular hairs, suprabasal pinnae with the pinnules arranged catadromically, and spores that are finely echinulate.
The Rhizome of Blackness: A Critical Ethnography of HipHop Culture, Language, Identity, and the Politics of Becoming (New York, NY: Peter Lang International Academic Publishers, 2014, pp.
microphyllum biological control agent must deplete rhizome carbohydrate reserves to effectively suppress regrowth and survival of the invasive fern.
Fabian Alamazan's Rhizome is the first record to be featured on the new BlueNote/ArtistShare record label.
calamus rhizome such as sedative, CNS depressant, anticonvulsant, antispasmodic, cardiovascular, hypolipidemic, immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, cryoprotective, antioxidant, antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, anticancer and antidiabetic has been reported.
Botanically, the food-storage organs that allow various plants to survive from one growing season to the next are identified by different terms such as bulb, tuber, tuberous root, rhizome and corm.
All of his earlier attempts to grow hops, using purchased rhizome pieces, had failed--the plants never came up.
The plant consists of upright aerial stems that arise from a very extensive underground rhizome system (Hauke, 1963).
It is harvested for its rhizome, which is used to treat diseases such as heart palpitation, convulsions, epilepsy, and insomnia and also used as a source of aromatic oil that is used as incense, as a flavoring agent, and in quality perfumes.
Plant healthy pieces of rhizome, 8in apart, leaving the top of the rhizome just above ground level.