rhizosphere

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rhi·zo·sphere

 (rī′zə-sfîr′)
n.
The area of soil that surrounds and is affected by the roots of plants.

rhizosphere

(ˈraɪzəʊˌsfɪə)
n
(Environmental Science) the region of the soil in contact with the roots of a plant. It contains many microorganisms and its composition is affected by root activities
References in periodicals archive ?
Role of soil microbes in the rhizospheres of plants growing on trace metal contaminated soils in phytoremediation.
Spatial variability is related to the vegetation, and more specifically to plant rhizospheres and canopies (Parkin 1993).
As such, the primary goal of the present study was to conduct a survey of the nematodes inhabiting the rhizospheres of five fruit tree species--murici, soursop, cupuacu, peach palm and passion fruit.
The fact that the bacterium has not been previously isolated from humans might be because it was isolated only from plant rhizospheres (2), so human studies have not been conducted.
Some other beneficial species were also detected from the rhizospheres of the crop rotation soil.
A case study from sub-Saharan Africa Richard Dick of Ohio State University presented Delivery of Hydrologic and Microbial Services by Indigenous Shrub Rhizospheres to Agroecosystems under a Changing Climate.
Papers from the 2009 Ecological Society of America symposium, written by soil ecologists, microbial ecologists, and agroecologists, offer an overview of the diversity and complexity of microbial activity and interactions in soil systems and the many ways in which microorganisms may be manipulated to improve the functions of crop rhizospheres and maximize crop yields.
The rhizospheres of 89% of the species tested were positive for nitrogenase activity (acetylene-dependent ethylene evolution).
These operate around roots (either living, or as dead remnants) and in rhizospheres over wide spatial and temporal scales.
Antibiotic resistance genes can be present in replicons that contain other selectable markers and that might explain the predominance of ampicillin resistance in the wetland plant rhizospheres.
Anaerobic metabolites, alkaloids, phenolics, terpenoids, and steroids are bioactive chemicals abundant in roots and rhizospheres in wetlands.