rickets


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Related to rickets: hypophosphatemic rickets

rick·ets

 (rĭk′ĭts)
n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
A bone disease of children marked by bone demineralization and defective bone growth, caused usually by a deficiency of or an impaired metabolism of vitamin D. Also called rachitis.

[Origin unknown.]

rickets

(ˈrɪkɪts)
n
(Pathology) (functioning as singular or plural) pathol a disease mainly of children, characterized by softening of developing bone, and hence bow legs, malnutrition, and enlargement of the liver and spleen, caused by a deficiency of vitamin D
[C17: of unknown origin]

rick•ets

(ˈrɪk ɪts)

n.
(used with a sing. v.) a childhood disease in which the bones soften from an inadequate intake of vitamin D and insufficient exposure to sunlight.
[1635–45; orig. uncertain]

rick·ets

(rĭk′ĭts)
A bone disorder in children that is caused by lack of vitamin D, either in the diet or from lack of exposure to sunlight. In a child with rickets, the bones do not grow properly and become soft and misshapen.

rickets

The disease of osteomalacia in children. Growing bones cannot calcify due to lack of nutrients, so their ends become visibly enlarged.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rickets - childhood disease caused by deficiency of vitamin D and sunlight associated with impaired metabolism of calcium and phosphorusrickets - childhood disease caused by deficiency of vitamin D and sunlight associated with impaired metabolism of calcium and phosphorus
avitaminosis, hypovitaminosis - any of several diseases caused by deficiency of one or more vitamins
Translations

rickets

[ˈrɪkɪts] NSINGraquitismo m

rickets

[ˈrɪkɪts] nrachitisme m

rickets

n singRachitis f, → die englische Krankheit

rickets

[ˈrɪkɪts] nsgrachitismo

rick·ets

n. raquitismo. V.: rachitism

rickets

n raquitismo
References in classic literature ?
At any rate he was wretchedly sick and undersized; he had the rickets, and though he was over three years old, he was no bigger than an ordinary child of one.
For how was it possible to believe that those large brown protuberant eyes in Silas Marner's pale face really saw nothing very distinctly that was not close to them, and not rather that their dreadful stare could dart cramp, or rickets, or a wry mouth at any boy who happened to be in the rear?
A TODDLER allegedly murdered by her adoptive father may have been suffering from vitamin D deficiency or even rickets when she died, a court has heard.
Rickets is the clinical consequence of defective bone mineralization in children (Table 1).
A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone deformities such as rickets in children and bone pain caused by a condition called osteomalacia in adults.
Nutritional rickets can be caused by either or both calcium and vitamin D deficiencies, and can frequently occur in Africa.
MERSEYSIDERS are three times more likely to suffer from Victorian era diseases like rickets and malnutrition than people living in other parts of the country, according to the latest figures.
On a tip off FC conducted operation in Chaharmang area of Nawgai Tehsil of Bajaur Agency and recovered 13 RPG 7 rockets, six fuse of RPG 7 rickets, five hand grenades, three SMK hand grenade, .
Rickets said the man who was killed was the likely subject of the search warrant the two officers had been serving.
Total quantity or scope: Vitamin D3 supplements to rickets, with and without fluoride, about 19 100 drums of 900 tablets.
Globally, rickets secondary to vitamin D deficiency and/or low dietary calcium intake remains a significant public health problem, not only in resource-poor countries but also in those that are better resourced, despite effective means being available for its prevention and treatment.
This is important for exclusively breast-fed infants and dark-skinned children, who are at particular risk of nutritional rickets," says Mayo Clinic family medicine physician Dr Tom Thacher, who is not part of the study.