rickety


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Related to rickety: rickets

rick·et·y

 (rĭk′ĭ-tē)
adj. rick·et·i·er, rick·et·i·est
1. Likely to break or fall apart; shaky.
2. Feeble with age; infirm.
3. Of, having, or resembling rickets.

[From rickets.]

rick′et·i·ness n.

rickety

(ˈrɪkɪtɪ)
adj
1. (of a structure, piece of furniture, etc) likely to collapse or break; shaky
2. feeble with age or illness; infirm
3. (Pathology) relating to, resembling, or afflicted with rickets
[C17: from rickets]
ˈricketiness n

rick•et•y

(ˈrɪk ɪ ti)

adj. -et•i•er, -et•i•est.
1. likely to fall or collapse; shaky: a rickety chair.
2. feeble in the joints; tottering: a rickety old man.
3. old, dilapidated, or in disrepair.
4. irregular, as motion or action.
5. affected with rickets.
6. pertaining to or of the nature of rickets.
[1675–85; ricket (s) + -y1]
rick′et•i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rickety - inclined to shake as from weakness or defect; "a rickety table"; "a wobbly chair with shaky legs"; "the ladder felt a little wobbly"; "the bridge still stands though one of the arches is wonky"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
2.rickety - affected with, suffering from, or characteristic of rickets; "rickety limbs and joints"; "a rachitic patient"
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"
3.rickety - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"

rickety

rickety

adjective
Not physically steady or firm:
Translations
مُتَقَلْقِل، عُرْضَةٌ للسُّقوط
vratký
vakkelvorn
haurashuterariisitautinen
valtur, óstöîugur
ļodzīgs

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪtɪ] ADJ
1. (= wobbly) → tambaleante, inseguro; [old car] → desvencijado
2. (Med) → raquítico

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪti] adj [chair, table] → bancal(e); [stairs, house] → branlant(e); [bus] → bringuebalant(e)
a rickety old bus → un vieil autobus tout bringuebalant

rickety

adj
furniture, stairs etcwack(e)lig; vehicleklapprig
(Med) → rachitisch

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪtɪ] adj (furniture, structure) → traballante

rickety

(ˈrikəti) adjective
not well built; unsteady; likely to fall over or collapse. a rickety table.
References in classic literature ?
But I soon found that there came such a draught of cold air over me from under the sill of the window, that this plan would never do at all, especially as another current from the rickety door met the one from the window, and both together formed a series of small whirlwinds in the immediate vicinity of the spot where I had thought to spend the night.
During this aside between Mose and Pete, two empty casks had been rolled into the cabin, and being secured from rolling, by stones on each side, boards were laid across them, which arrangement, together with the turning down of certain tubs and pails, and the disposing of the rickety chairs, at last completed the preparation.
The walls were moldy and hung with ancient cobwebs; the curtains and beddings were rotten; the furniture was rickety and ready to fall to pieces.
She locked herself in and walked mechanically, with a woman's first impulse in a strange bedroom, to the rickety little table and the dingy little looking-glass.
I am as rickety as a hackney-coach, I'm as sleepy as laudanum, my lines is strained to that degree that I shouldn't know, if it wasn't for the pain in 'em, which was me and which somebody else, yet I'm none the better for it in pocket; and it's my suspicion that you've been at it from morning to night to prevent me from being the better for it in pocket, and I won't put up with it, Aggerawayter, and what do you say now
Of the shape of the room, of the cracks in the ceiling, of the paper on the walls, of the flaws in the window-glass making ripples and dimples on the prospect, of the washing-stand being rickety on its three legs, and having a discontented something about it, which reminded me of Mrs.
That the productions of such marriages are generally scrofulous, rickety, or deformed children; by which means the family seldom continues above three generations, unless the wife takes care to provide a healthy father, among her neighbours or domestics, in order to improve and continue the breed.
Then he flung himself into the rickety chair that was standing by the table and buried his face in his hands.
The hard, narrow, wretched, rickety bed of Don Quixote stood first in the middle of this star-lit stable, and close beside it Sancho made his, which merely consisted of a rush mat and a blanket that looked as if it was of threadbare canvas rather than of wool.
Fortunately, he fancied that Dantes was delirious; and placing the food on the rickety table, he withdrew.
Indeed, being much bruised and rather rickety, owing to the violent treatment it had suffered from the Hutchinson mob, most people would have thought that its days of usefulness were over.
with only the thinnest vesture of human similitude about it, through which was evident the stiff, rickety, incongruous, faded, tattered, good-for-nothing patchwork of its substance, ready to sink in a heap upon the floor, as conscious of its own unworthiness to be erect.