rickety


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Related to rickety: rickets

rick·et·y

 (rĭk′ĭ-tē)
adj. rick·et·i·er, rick·et·i·est
1. Likely to break or fall apart; shaky.
2. Feeble with age; infirm.
3. Of, having, or resembling rickets.

[From rickets.]

rick′et·i·ness n.

rickety

(ˈrɪkɪtɪ)
adj
1. (of a structure, piece of furniture, etc) likely to collapse or break; shaky
2. feeble with age or illness; infirm
3. (Pathology) relating to, resembling, or afflicted with rickets
[C17: from rickets]
ˈricketiness n

rick•et•y

(ˈrɪk ɪ ti)

adj. -et•i•er, -et•i•est.
1. likely to fall or collapse; shaky: a rickety chair.
2. feeble in the joints; tottering: a rickety old man.
3. old, dilapidated, or in disrepair.
4. irregular, as motion or action.
5. affected with rickets.
6. pertaining to or of the nature of rickets.
[1675–85; ricket (s) + -y1]
rick′et•i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rickety - inclined to shake as from weakness or defect; "a rickety table"; "a wobbly chair with shaky legs"; "the ladder felt a little wobbly"; "the bridge still stands though one of the arches is wonky"
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
2.rickety - affected with, suffering from, or characteristic of rickets; "rickety limbs and joints"; "a rachitic patient"
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"
3.rickety - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"

rickety

rickety

adjective
Not physically steady or firm:
Translations
مُتَقَلْقِل، عُرْضَةٌ للسُّقوط
vratký
vakkelvorn
haurashuterariisitautinen
valtur, óstöîugur
ļodzīgs

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪtɪ] ADJ
1. (= wobbly) → tambaleante, inseguro; [old car] → desvencijado
2. (Med) → raquítico

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪti] adj [chair, table] → bancal(e); [stairs, house] → branlant(e); [bus] → bringuebalant(e)
a rickety old bus → un vieil autobus tout bringuebalant

rickety

adj
furniture, stairs etcwack(e)lig; vehicleklapprig
(Med) → rachitisch

rickety

[ˈrɪkɪtɪ] adj (furniture, structure) → traballante

rickety

(ˈrikəti) adjective
not well built; unsteady; likely to fall over or collapse. a rickety table.
References in classic literature ?
At the side of the bed, with a bottle of gin on the rickety table between them, sat two hideous leering, painted monsters, wearing the dress of women.
The furniture could not have been much simpler: a very old chair, a rickety old bed, and a tumble-down table.
With this reply Old Sharon held out his unwashed hand across the rickety ink-splashed table at which he was sitting.
Indeed, being much bruised and rather rickety, owing to the violent treatment it had suffered from the Hutchinson mob, most people would have thought that its days of usefulness were over.
The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line.
And so the two walked together through the dark alley to the end of the rickety, dismantled dock; the one thinking of the vast reward the King would lavish upon her for the information she felt sure she alone could give; the other feeling beneath his mantle for the hilt of a long dagger which nestled there.
They had to help me down the rickety wharf and into the salmon boat.
At night the boxes and other effects of the passengers were placed against the rickety doors.
The manager's voice recalled him from a more careful inspection of the building, to the opposite side of the proscenium, where, at a small mahogany table with rickety legs and of an oblong shape, sat a stout, portly female, apparently between forty and fifty, in a tarnished silk cloak, with her bonnet dangling by the strings in her hand, and her hair (of which she had a great quantity) braided in a large festoon over each temple.
I am as rickety as a hackney-coach, I'm as sleepy as laudanum, my lines is strained to that degree that I shouldn't know, if it wasn't for the pain in 'em, which was me and which somebody else, yet I'm none the better for it in pocket; and it's my suspicion that you've been at it from morning to night to prevent me from being the better for it in pocket, and I won't put up with it, Aggerawayter, and what do you say now
That the productions of such marriages are generally scrofulous, rickety, or deformed children; by which means the family seldom continues above three generations, unless the wife takes care to provide a healthy father, among her neighbours or domestics, in order to improve and continue the breed.
The hard, narrow, wretched, rickety bed of Don Quixote stood first in the middle of this star-lit stable, and close beside it Sancho made his, which merely consisted of a rush mat and a blanket that looked as if it was of threadbare canvas rather than of wool.