riddlingly

riddlingly

(ˈrɪdəlɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a riddling or puzzling manner
References in periodicals archive ?
And the image of the Dutch Jews carrying their boulders, with its cruel echo of the myth of Sisyphus, returns in a riddlingly literal form in the novel's final pages.
In light of the emphasis placed in the Dichterweihe on the distance separating humankind from the gods, it makes a certain amount of sense that the Muses should speak riddlingly to Hesiod; that is how gods are usually represented as speaking to humans.
As humorous is my contrition As my profane love, and as soon forgot: As riddlingly distempered, cold and hot, As praying, as mute; as infinite, as none.
Moreover, it is immediately preceded by eight lines newly set into the narrative, in which Gerve's du Bus is riddlingly named as the author of the first roman:
That final word, "sleep," belongs instead to the delights of the beckoning, re-echoing, dark sylvan enclosure, to the ominous deeps of ever-ambivalent solitary inwardness with its riddlingly two-sided closure-and-opening into unconscious sources of death-and-life.
Such impossibility--capturing the nature of verbal objects using nothing more than riddlingly figurated language in the first place--has always been the hallmark of deconstructive thought.
For if a man runs to the image and wants to seize it as if it was the reality (like a beautiful reflection playing on the water, which some story somewhere, I think, said riddlingly a man wanted to catch and sank down into the stream and disappeared) then this man who clings to beautiful bodies and will not let them go, will, like the man in the story, but in soul, not in body, sink down into the dark depths where intellect has no delight, and stay blind in Hades, consorting with shadows there and here.