ride out


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ride

 (rīd)
v. rode (rōd), rid·den (rĭd′n), rid·ing, rides
v.intr.
1.
a. To be carried or conveyed, as in a vehicle or on horseback.
b. Sports To participate in a board sport such as snowboarding.
2. To travel over a surface: This car rides well.
3. To move by way of an intangible force or impetus; move as if on water: The President rode into office on a tide of discontent.
4. Nautical To lie at anchor: battleships riding at the mouth of the estuary.
5. To seem to float: The moon was riding among the clouds.
6. To be sustained or supported on a pivot, axle, or other point.
7. To be contingent; depend: The final outcome rides on the results of the election.
8. To continue without interference: Let the matter ride.
9. To work or move from the proper place, especially on the body: pants that ride up.
v.tr.
1.
a. To sit on and control the movement of: rode a motorcycle to town; ride a horse to the village.
b. Sports To glide or move while standing on or having one's feet attached to (a board, such as a snowboard).
2. To travel over, along, or through: ride the highways.
3. To be supported or carried on: a swimmer riding the waves.
4. To take part in or do by riding: He rode his last race.
5. To cause to ride, especially to cause to be carried: The police rode him down to the station.
6. Sports To control (an opponent) in wrestling, usually by holding the opponent down.
7. Nautical To keep (a vessel) at anchor.
8. Informal
a. To tease or ridicule.
b. To harass with persistent carping and criticism.
9. To keep partially engaged by slightly depressing a pedal with the foot: Don't ride the clutch or the brakes.
n.
1. The act or an instance of riding, as in a vehicle or on an animal.
2. A path made for riding on horseback, especially through woodlands.
3. A device, such as one at an amusement park, that one rides for pleasure or excitement.
4. A means of transportation: waiting for her ride to come.
Phrasal Verb:
ride out
To survive or outlast: rode out the storm.
Idioms:
ride for a fall
To court danger or disaster.
ride herd on
To keep watch or control over.
ride high
To experience success.
ride shotgun
1. To guard a person or thing while in transit.
2. Slang To ride in the front passenger seat of a car or truck.
take for a ride Slang
1. To deceive or swindle: an author who tried to take his publisher for a ride.
2. To transport to a place and kill.

[Middle English riden, from Old English rīdan; see reidh- in Indo-European roots.]

rid′a·ble, ride′a·ble adj.

ride out

vb
(tr, adverb) to endure successfully; survive (esp in the phrase ride out the storm)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.ride out - hang on during a trial of endurance; "ride out the storm"
outstay - surpass in staying power; "They outstayed their competitors"

ride

verb
1. Informal. To tease or mock good-humoredly:
Informal: kid, rib.
Slang: jive, rag, razz.
2. Informal. To torment with persistent insult or ridicule:
Informal: needle.
Idiom: wave the red flag in front of the bull.
phrasal verb
ride out
To exist in spite of adversity:
noun
A trip in a motor vehicle:
Informal: spin, whirl.
Translations

w>ride out

vt sepüberstehen; to ride out the storm (lit, fig)den Sturm überstehen
vi (on horse) → ausreiten, einen Ausritt machen
References in periodicals archive ?
Their other son, Jeff, 9, managed to ride out his horse's bucking and later found his parents and brother flat on the ground in a field off Vasquez Canyon and Bouquet Canyon roads.
The best addition you can make is to improve your riding skills by taking a BikeSafe ride out.
Everyone has been so helpful with all the fundraisers, especially the biker community - we have had a few ride outs and raised big amounts of money.