ridiculer


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rid·i·cule

 (rĭd′ĭ-kyo͞ol′)
n.
1. The act of using words, gestures, images, or other products of expression to evoke laughter or contemptuous feelings regarding a person or thing: a remark that invited the ridicule of his classmates.
2. The words or other products of expression used in this way: was subjected to a torrent of ridicule.
tr.v. rid·i·culed, rid·i·cul·ing, rid·i·cules
To expose to ridicule; make fun of.

[French, from Latin rīdiculum, joke, from neuter of rīdiculus, laughable; see ridiculous.]

rid′i·cul′er n.
Synonyms: ridicule, mock, taunt1, deride
These verbs refer to making another the butt of amusement or mirth. Ridicule implies purposeful disparagement: "My father discouraged me by ridiculing my performances" (Benjamin Franklin).
To mock is to poke fun at someone, often by mimicking and caricaturing speech or actions: "the bear ... [devoured] the children who mocked God's servant Elisha for his baldness" (Garrison Keillor).
Taunt suggests mocking, insulting, or scornful reproach: "taunting him with want of courage to leap into the great pit" (Daniel Defoe).
Deride implies scorn and contempt: "Was all the world in a conspiracy to deride his failure?" (Edith Wharton).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ridiculer - a humorist who uses ridicule and irony and sarcasmridiculer - a humorist who uses ridicule and irony and sarcasm
humorist, humourist - someone who acts speaks or writes in an amusing way
References in periodicals archive ?
Quickly picking up on this, I observed that my full name was Albatross Heckler, obviously a synonym for an iconoclast or a ridiculer of sacred cows.
For all his faults he was, as one friend wrote, "a dedicated pacifist, a ridiculer of the goose-step, a foe of peonage and patronage.
At least he is bolder than Picasso, the ridiculer of Pollock.