rightness


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right

 (rīt)
adj. right·er, right·est
1. Conforming with or conformable to justice, law, or morality: do the right thing and confess.
2. In accordance with fact, reason, or truth; correct: the right answer.
3. Fitting, proper, or appropriate: It is not right to leave the party without saying goodbye.
4. Most favorable, desirable, or convenient: the right time to act.
5. In or into a satisfactory state or condition: put things right.
6. In good mental or physical health or order.
7. Intended to be worn or positioned facing outward or toward an observer: the right side of the dress; made sure that the right side of the fabric was visible.
8.
a. Of, belonging to, located on, or being the side of the body to the south when the subject is facing east.
b. Of, relating to, directed toward, or located on the right side.
c. Located on the right side of a person facing downstream: the right bank of a river.
9. often Right Of or belonging to the political or intellectual right.
10. Mathematics
a. Formed by or in reference to a line or plane that is perpendicular to another line or plane.
b. Having the axis perpendicular to the base: right cone.
c. Having a right angle: a right triangle.
11. Straight; uncurved; direct: a right line.
12. Archaic Not spurious; genuine.
n.
1. That which is just, moral, or proper.
2.
a. The direction or position on the right side.
b. The right side.
c. The right hand.
d. A turn in the direction of the right hand or side.
3. often Right
a. The people and groups who advocate the adoption of conservative or reactionary measures, especially in government and politics. Also called right wing.
b. The opinion of those advocating such measures.
4. Sports A blow delivered by a boxer's right hand.
5. Baseball Right field.
6.
a. A just or legal claim or title.
b. Something that is due to a person or governmental body by law, tradition, or nature.
c. Something, especially humane treatment, claimed to be due to animals by moral principle.
7. often rights
a. An existing stockholder's legally protected claim to purchase additional shares in a corporation ahead of those who are not currently stockholders, especially at a cost lower than market value.
b. The negotiable paper on which such an entitlement is indicated.
adv.
1. Toward or on the right.
2. In a straight line; directly: went right to school.
3. In the proper or desired manner; well: The jacket doesn't fit right.
4. Exactly; just: The accident happened right over there.
5. Immediately: called me right after dinner.
6. Completely; quite: The icy wind blew right through me.
7. According to law, morality, or justice.
8. Accurately; correctly: answered the question right.
9. Chiefly Southern US Considerably; very: They have a right nice place.
10. Used as an intensive: kept right on going.
11. Used in titles: The Right Reverend Jane Smith.
v. right·ed, right·ing, rights
v.tr.
1. To put in or restore to an upright or proper position: They righted their boat.
2. To put in order or set right; correct: measures designed to right generations of unfair labor practices.
3. To make reparation or amends for; redress: right a wrong.
v.intr.
To regain an upright or proper position.
Idioms:
by rights
In a just or proper manner; justly.
in (one's) own right
Through the force of one's own skills or qualifications.
right and left
From all directions or on every side: criticism coming right and left; questions raised from right and left.
right away/off
Immediately; at once; without delay.
right on
Slang Used as an exclamation of encouragement, support, or enthusiastic agreement.
to rights
In a satisfactory or orderly condition: set the place to rights.

[Middle English, from Old English riht; see reg- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 3, from the fact that conservatives sit on the right side of the legislative chamber in various assemblies .]

right′er n.
right′ness n.
Synonyms: right, privilege, prerogative, perquisite
These nouns apply to something, such as a power or possession, to which one has an established claim. Right refers to a legally, morally, or traditionally just claim: "An unconditional right to say what one pleases about public affairs is what I consider to be the minimum guarantee of the First Amendment" (Hugo L. Black).
Privilege usually suggests an advantage or opportunity not enjoyed by everyone: Use of the company jet was a privilege reserved for the top executives. Prerogative denotes an exclusive right or privilege, as one based on custom, law, or office: It is my prerogative to change my mind.
A perquisite is a privilege accorded by virtue of one's employment, position, or rank: "The old newspapers and wax candle-ends from the drawing-room were the perquisites of the butler" (Elizabeth Langland).
Our Living Language Speakers of Standard English mainly restrict the use of adverbial right to modify adverbs of space or time, as in She's right over there or Do it right now! No such restriction applies in Southern vernacular speech, where right can be used to intensify the meaning of many adjectives and adverbs, as in He's right nice or You talk right fast. This broader use of right is attested as far back as the 1400s and is found in the works of Shakespeare and other great writers. Thus, what appears to be neglect of Standard English rules is actually the retention of a historical usage. · The use of right as an adverb indicating directness, completeness, or general intensity seems to be related to the use of right in a more concrete sense to refer to something that is perfectly straight or perpendicular to something else, as in right angle. A similar connection between concrete and metaphorical meaning lies behind the Southern adverbial usage of plumb, as in He fell plumb asleep as an indicator of completeness or totality.

rightness

(ˈraɪtnɪs)
n
the state or quality of being right
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rightness - according with conscience or morality
morality - concern with the distinction between good and evil or right and wrong; right or good conduct
wrongness - contrary to conscience or morality
2.rightness - appropriate conductrightness - appropriate conduct; doing the right thing
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
3.rightness - conformity to fact or truth
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
incorrectness, wrongness - the quality of not conforming to fact or truth
4.rightness - conformity with some esthetic standard of correctness or propriety; "it was performed with justness and beauty"
conformance, conformity - correspondence in form or appearance

rightness

noun
1. The quality or state of being morally sound:
2. The moral quality of a course of action:
Translations
صِحَّه، أحَقيَّه
poctivostsprávnost
rigtighed
réttleiki
doğrulukhaklılık

rightness

[ˈraɪtnɪs] N (= correctness) → exactitud f; (= justice) → justicia f

rightness

[ˈraɪtnɪs] n (= moral acceptability) → moralité fright-of-centre [ˌraɪtəvˈsɛntər] (British) right-of-center (US) adj (politically)(de) centre droitright of way n
(= right to cross private property) → droit m de passage
(= public path) → chemin m communal
(in traffic) (= priority) → priorité f
It was our right of way → Nous avions la priorité.
to have right of way → avoir la prioritéright-on [ˌraɪtˈɒn] adj [person, idea] → politiquement correct(e)rights issue némission f préférentielle, émission f de droits de souscription

right

(rait) adjective
1. on or related to the side of the body which in most people has the more skilful hand, or to the side of a person or thing which is toward the east when that person or thing is facing north (opposite to left). When I'm writing, I hold my pen in my right hand.
2. correct. Put that book back in the right place; Is that the right answer to the question?
3. morally correct; good. It's not right to let thieves keep what they have stolen.
4. suitable; appropriate. He's not the right man for this job; When would be the right time to ask him?
noun
1. something a person is, or ought to be, allowed to have, do etc. Everyone has the right to a fair trial; You must fight for your rights; You have no right to say that.
2. that which is correct or good. Who's in the right in this argument?
3. the right side, part or direction. Turn to the right; Take the second road on the right.
4. in politics, the people, group, party or parties holding the more traditional beliefs etc.
adverb
1. exactly. He was standing right here.
2. immediately. I'll go right after lunch; I'll come right down.
3. close. He was standing right beside me.
4. completely; all the way. The bullet went right through his arm.
5. to the right. Turn right.
6. correctly. Have I done that right?; I don't think this sum is going to turn out right.
verb
1. to bring back to the correct, usually upright, position. The boat tipped over, but righted itself again.
2. to put an end to and make up for something wrong that has been done. He's like a medieval knight, going about the country looking for wrongs to right.
interjection
I understand; I'll do what you say etc. `I want you to type some letters for me.' `Right, I'll do them now.'
righteous (ˈraitʃəs) adjective
1. (of anger etc) justifiable. righteous indignation.
2. living a good moral life. a righteous man.
3. good; morally right. a righteous action.
ˈrighteously adverb
ˈrighteousness noun
ˈrightful adjective
proper; correct; that ought to be or has a right to be something. He is the rightful king of this country.
ˈrightfully adverb
It rightfully belongs to me, although she has it at the moment.
ˈrightly adverb
1. justly, justifiably; it is right, good or just that (something is the case). He was punished for his stupidity and rightly: Rightly or wrongly she refused to speak to him.
2. correctly; accurately. They rightly assumed that he would refuse to help.
ˈrightness noun
the state of being good or morally correct. They believe in the rightness of their cause.
righto, right-oh (raitˈou) interjection
right. Right-oh! I'll come now.
rights noun plural
the legal right given in return for a sum of money to produce eg a film from a book. He has sold the film rights of his new book to an American company.
right angle
an angle of ninety degrees, like any of the four angles in a square.
ˈright-angled adjective
having a right angle. a right-angled triangle.
ˈright-hand adjective
1. at the right; to the right of something else. the top right-hand drawer of my desk.
2. towards the right. a right-hand bend in the road.
ˌright-ˈhanded adjective
(of people) using the right hand more easily than the left, eg for writing. The majority of people are right-handed.
right wing
the members of a political party who hold more traditional opinions. He's on the right wing of the Labour Party.
adjective
(ˌright-ˈwing) (having opinions which are) of this sort.
ˌright-ˈwinger noun
by right(s)
rightfully. By rights, I ought to be in charge of this department.
get/keep on the right side of
to make (someone) feel, or continue to feel, friendly or kind towards oneself. If you want a pay rise, you'd better get on the right side of the boss.
get right
to understand, do, say etc (something) correctly. Did I get the answer right?
go right
to happen as expected, wanted or intended; to be successful or without problems. Nothing ever goes right for him.
not in one's right mind, not (quite) right in the head
(slightly) mad. He can't be in his right mind – making incredible suggestions like that!
put right
1. to repair; to remove faults etc in (something). There is something wrong with this kettle – can you put it right?
2. to put an end to or change (something that is wrong). You've made a mistake in that sum – you'd better put it right.
3. to put (a watch, clock etc) to the correct time.
4. to correct (someone who has made a mistake). I thought the meeting was at 2.30, but he put me right.
5. to make healthy again. That medicine will soon put you right.
put/set to rights
to put back into the correct order, state etc. The room was in a dreadful mess, and it took us the whole day to set it to rights.
right away
immediately; at once.
right-hand man
a person's most trusted and useful assistant.
right now
immediately.
right of way
1. the right of the public to use a path that goes across private property.
2. (ˌright-of-ˈway – plural ˈrights-of-ˈway) a road or path over private land, along which the public have a right to walk.
3. the right of one car etc to move first eg when crossing a cross-roads, or going round a roundabout. It was your fault that our cars crashed – I had right of way.
serve right
to be the punishment deserved by. If you fall and hurt yourself, it'll serve you right for climbing up there when I told you not to.
References in classic literature ?
Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feel- ing, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody.
She could not see the world divided into separate compartments of good people and bad people, any more than she could believe so implicitly in the rightness of her own thought as to wish to bring the population of the British Isles into agreement with it.
But he was convinced of the rightness of his position.
Was she convinced of the intellectual rightness of the stand she had taken?
He had been really trying to acknowledge it by taking the rightness of her feeling for granted on every other occasion.
Very cautiously, in the next half hour, Saxon tried to feel out her husband's attitude, to find if he doubted the rightness of the violence he and his brother teamsters committed.
the six-speed manual Mazda MX-5 has that inherent rightness about it that hasn't dated LIGHTER, sharper and better engineered than the car it replaces, this fourth-generation Mazda MX-5 does everything right.
guiltiness or rightness in the world situation but prevent the confrontation between them.
Muhyiddin added that he has published a number of researches, which confirm the rightness of the theory of discovery in the European Journal of Science.
I believe that if Pyotr Poroshenko is a 'president of the peace' and he held really sincerely talks on the Minsk document, he must safeguard his rightness and thus neutralize those who want to plunge Ukraine into civil war again," Lavrov said in an interview with Vesti Weekly TV program.
Obama needs to build a complicated case very carefully, and persuade Americans of its rightness and feasibility.