rigorism


Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rig·or·ism

 (rĭg′ə-rĭz′əm)
n.
Harshness or strictness in conduct, judgment, or practice.

rig′or·ist n.
rig′or·is′tic adj.

rigorism

(ˈrɪɡəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. strictness in judgment or conduct
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the religious cult of extreme self-denial
3. (Theology) RC theol the doctrine that in cases of doubt in moral matters the stricter course must always be followed
ˈrigorist n
ˌrigorˈistic adj

rigorism

tutiorism.
See also: Philosophy
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
finds "the Church repeatedly sought a way beyond both rigorism and laxity" (31), his opponents find a "very severe penitential approach" (123).
com)-- Richmond author Alaric Cabiling has published "Insanity By Increments," his first published work since the release of 2009's The Darkest Day and 2013's Gray Rigorism.
For U-Vistract to lay claim to national confidence, it also required the appearance of a local grounding in traditions of place, alongside Christian moral rigorism and being seen like a developmental state that could deliver services.
A fierce focus on academic success among the young and career success for adults builds habits of discipline that can function reasonably well without old-fashioned moral rigorism.
For instance, it follows from this rigorism of self-righteous fanatics that it must be also a mortal sin to hold public office.
The argument, however, is finally rejected as a subtle form of an unreasonably demanding moral rigorism.
Timmermann argues that such an interpretation is not only incompatible with Kant's mature view of moral motivation, but also unnecessary to rescuing Kant from common objections to his rigorism.
As White points out, "in late eighteenth-century religious terms, Barbauld's was a controversial yet still essentially a moderate position, tempering the enthusiasm of Puritan devotion and Calvinist rigorism in order to produce an open and warm religion that would be more endearing and personal than Socinian Dissent and both more demanding and less indifferent than the Church" (36).
Another asked, "Is rigorism needed today, or sanctity coupled with skills?
In his breathtaking rigorism he constitutes an early culmination of radical re-thinking of all categories of Islam through the Prophet.
The first chapter, on Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy and Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and Hamlet, claims that the plays endorse the efficacy of traditional, extensive mourning ritual: Hieronimo and Isabella, the protagonists of The Spanish Tragedy, preserve in their flamboyant demands for and attempts at revenge the "passionate remembrance" associated with Catholic ritual (38); Titus Andronicus's antagonists, Tamora and Aaron, represent a Protestant rigorism opposed by Titus in his commitment to elaborate funeral rites; and Hamlet maintains an ideal of "maximized mourning" that governs not only his sartorial choices but also his revenge efforts.
One way to understand American missionaries' religious-ethical rigorism is to think of it in relation to their desire to ensure the purity of the church.