rime riche


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Related to rime riche: fabliau, triple rhymes

rime riche

 (rēm rēsh′)
n. pl. rimes riches (rēm rēsh′)
Rhyme using words or parts of words that are pronounced identically but have different meanings, for example, write-right or port-deport. Also called identical rhyme.

[French : rime, rhyme + riche, rich.]

rime riche

(ˈriːm ˈriːʃ)
n, pl rimes riches (ˈriːmˈriːʃ)
(Poetry) rhyme between words or syllables that are identical in sound, as in command/demand, pair/pear
[French, literally: rich rhyme]

rime riche

(ˈrim ˈriʃ)

n., pl. rimes riches (ˈrim ˈriʃ)
rhyme created by using identical syllable groups or different words pronounced the same, as in lighted, delighted; sole, soul.
[1900–05; < French: literally, rich rhyme]
References in periodicals archive ?
Rime riche was thought acceptable only in French poetry, not English, just as French fixed forms were thought suitable only for light verse, not serious poetry, because poetic form was assumed to be at odds with the poet's feeling.
While Swinburne's roundels often exemplified Gosse's "exact form in literature" and certainly were tours de force of versifying technique, this section shows that their activist rhymes also contradicted a number of contemporary prosodie prescriptions: specifically that French fixed forms were suitable only for light verse, not serious poetry, and that French rime riche was acceptable only in French verse, not English.
This French revival led Swinburne to experiment with rime riche in English.
19) The 1877 Athenaeum summed up the perspectives of many in this late-Victorian rhyme culture: rime riche in English verse was a "barbarism.
In A Century of Roundels, however, Swinburne frequently experimented with rime riche to explore the master concern of his verse: the relationship of repetition and change.
Swinburne's use of rime riche in the roundels has recently been described by Tucker as an "oddity" (p.
Like the 1877 Athenaeum's claim that rime riche in English is a "barbarism," which suggests a corrupting foreignness, Dobson opens admitting that to many contemporary Victorians, French verse forms seemed a "foreign product"
21) In a footnote, Tucker also enumerates Century's rime riche.
In French, rime riche was required by the Romantics, and since then it is still quite popular, perhaps because of the phonetic monosyllabism of endings in modern French.
Through the poetic device of rime riche, Shakespeare stresses the pitilessness of the social context imagined by the play.
Cette lignee part des romantiques : Hugo ("l'escalier/Derobe"), Musset s'autorisant a rimer faiblement (3) contre la tyrannie de la rime riche, homologue de la tyrannie du vers libre cent ans plus tard.