rind


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rind

 (rīnd)
n.
A tough outer covering such as bark, the skin of some fruits, or the coating on cheese or bacon.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

rind

(raɪnd)
n
1. (Cookery) a hard outer layer or skin on bacon, cheese, etc
2. (Botany) the outer layer of a fruit or of the spore-producing body of certain fungi
3. (Botany) the outer layer of the bark of a tree
[Old English rinde; Old High German rinta, German Rinde]

rind

(raɪnd)

n.
1. a thick and firm outer coat or covering: watermelon rind; orange rind; bacon rind.
2. the bark of a tree.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English rind(e) tree bark, crust; c. German Rinde]
rind′less, adj.
rind′y, adj.

rind

  • crust - From French crouste, from Latin crusta, "rind, shell; incrustation."
  • pith - First referred to the spongy cellular tissue in the stems and branches of many plants, and also the spongy white tissue lining the rind of citrus fruits.
  • rind, peel - The rind is the hard or tough covering on oranges, grapefruit, and watermelon; once removed, skin or rind is usually known as peel.
  • sward - The rind of bacon or pork.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rind - the natural outer covering of food (usually removed before eating)
bacon rind - the rind of bacon
peel, skin - the rind of a fruit or vegetable
cheese rind - the rind of a cheese
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"

rind

noun
1. skin, peel, outer layer, epicarp grated lemon rind
2. crust, covering, shell, husk, integument Cut off the rind of the cheese

rind

noun
The outer covering of a fruit:
Translations
قِشْرَه، سَطْح جاف
kůra
skalskorpesvær
kuori
börkur; hÿîi; para; skorpa
ādiņamiza
lupina

rind

[raɪnd] N [of fruit] → cáscara f; [of cheese, bacon] → corteza f

rind

[ˈraɪnd] n
[bacon] → couenne f
[cheese] → croûte f
(= peel) [lemon, orange] → écorce f
grated rind of 1 orange → zeste d'une orange

rind

n (of cheese)Rinde f; (of bacon)Schwarte f; (of fruit)Schale f

rind

[raɪnd] n (of fruit) → buccia; (of lemon) → scorza; (of cheese) → crosta; (of bacon) → cotenna

rind

(raind) noun
a thick, hard outer layer or covering, especially the outer surface of cheese or bacon, or the peel of fruit. bacon-rind; lemon-rind.
References in classic literature ?
Then she peeled it, ate it, and threw the rind out of the window, and it so happened that a mare that was running loose in the court below ate up the rind.
I therefore made no scruple of gathering and eating it, without knowing that the inhabitants always peeled it, the rind being a violent purgative; so that, eating the fruit and skin together, I fell into such a disorder as almost brought me to my end.
Now as the blubber envelopes the whale precisely as the rind does an orange, so is it stripped off from the body precisely as an orange is sometimes stripped by spiralizing it.
In some previous place I have described to you how the blubber wraps the body of the whale, as the rind wraps an orange.
They walked over to a monstrous big, hollow pumpkin which had a door and windows cut through the rind.
The colour on her cheek was like the bloom on a good apple, which is as sound at the core as it is red on the rind.
They had Camembert cheese, and it disgusted Philip to see that she ate rind and all of the portion that was given her.
In fact, one of them offered her a gourd of milk--a filthy, smoke-begrimed gourd, with the ancient rind of long-curdled milk caked in layers within its neck; but the spirit of the giver touched her deeply, and her face lightened for a moment with one of those almost forgotten smiles of radiance that had helped to make her beauty famous both in Baltimore and London.
I am aware that within this disintegrating body which has been dying since I was born I carry a skeleton, that under the rind of flesh which is called my face is a bony, noseless death's head.
I'll call th' robin up," he said, "and give him th' rind o' th' bacon to peck at.
I stole some bread, some rind of cheese, about half a jar of mincemeat (which I tied up in my pocket-handkerchief with my last night's slice), some brandy from a stone bottle (which I decanted into a glass bottle I had secretly used for making that intoxicating fluid, Spanish-liquorice-water, up in my room: diluting the stone bottle from a jug in the kitchen cupboard), a meat bone with very little on it, and a beautiful round compact pork pie.
it was beautiful, never before nor since have I seen such beauty, for there was this about the loveliness of my daughter, the Lily: it seemed to flow from within--yes, as light will flow through the thin rind of a gourd, and in that she differed from the other women of our people, who, when they are fair are fair with the flesh alone.