rioter


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Related to rioter: Run Riot

ri·ot

 (rī′ət)
n.
1. A wild or turbulent disturbance created by a large number of people.
2. Law A violent disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons assembled for a common purpose.
3. An unrestrained outbreak, as of laughter or passions.
4. A profusion: The garden was a riot of colors in August.
5.
a. Unrestrained merrymaking; revelry.
b. Debauchery.
6. Slang An irresistibly funny person or thing: Isn't she a riot?
v. ri·ot·ed, ri·ot·ing, ri·ots
v.intr.
1. To take part in a riot.
2. To live wildly or engage in uncontrolled revelry.
v.tr.
To waste (money or time) in wild or wanton living: "rioted his life out, and made an end" (Tennyson).

[Middle English, from Old French, dispute, from rioter, to quarrel, perhaps from ruire, to roar, from Latin rūgīre.]

ri′ot·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rioter - troublemaker who participates in a violent disturbance of the peacerioter - troublemaker who participates in a violent disturbance of the peace; someone who rises up against the constituted authority
bad hat, mischief-maker, trouble maker, troublemaker, troubler - someone who deliberately stirs up trouble
Translations
مُشاغِب
buřičvýtržník
oprørerspektakelmager
óeirîarseggur
buričvýtržník
âsiisyancı

rioter

[ˈraɪətəʳ] Namotinado/a m/f

rioter

[ˈraɪətər] némeutier/ière m/friot gear ntenue f antiémeute
in riot gear → en tenue antiémeute

rioter

nRandalierer(in) m(f); (= rebel)Aufrührer(in) m(f)

rioter

[ˈraɪətəʳ] ndimostrante m/f (durante dei disordini)

riot

(ˈraiət) noun
a noisy disturbance created by a usually large group of people. The protest march developed into a riot.
verb
to form or take part in a riot. The protesters were rioting in the street.
ˈrioter noun
ˈriotous adjective
1. starting, or likely to start, a riot. a riotous crowd.
2. very active, noisy and cheerful. a riotous party.
ˈriotously adverb
ˈriotousness noun
run riot
to behave wildly; to go out of control.
References in classic literature ?
There was little of that sort of customary thing where the tenor and the soprano stand down by the footlights, warbling, with blended voices, and keep holding out their arms toward each other and drawing them back and spreading both hands over first one breast and then the other with a shake and a pressure--no, it was every rioter for himself and no blending.
There is in the world a very aged rioter and demagogue who breaks into the most refined retreats with the dreadful information that all men are brothers, and wherever this leveller went on his pale horse it was Father Brown's trade to follow.
It had escaped the notice of those present that the shelf on which the rioter had taken refuge was within comfortable reach of the dresser, but Eustace himself had not overlooked this important strategic point.
The fact was that Emery's son had run a great chance of being suffocated, one of the rioters having proposed to squeeze him until he gave up all the gold he had swallowed.
At the motion of his hand, the four rioters resumed their seats; the more readily, because their violent exertions had wearied them, youthful though they were.
But we must now leave the rioters for a time, and take a peep into the lieutenant-governor's splendid mansion.
Monsieur, a few of the rioters were left upon the square, and one among them who was not a common man.
They are pouring through the alley of Heraclides, which leads directly from the palace; -- therefore the king is most probably among the rioters.
This troop, the only defence of the prison, overawed by its firm attitude not only the disorderly riotous mass of the populace, but also the detachment of the burgher guard, which, being placed opposite the Buytenhof to support the soldiers in keeping order, gave to the rioters the example of seditious cries, shouting, --
He lived through the reign of Edward's grandson, Richard II, and knew him from the time when as a gallant yellow-haired boy he had faced Wat Tyler and his rioters, till as a worn and broken prisoner he yielded the crown to Henry of Lancaster, the son of John of Gaunt.
Sparkling and tingling after so long a nap, they pushed at their corks to help the corkscrew (like prisoners helping rioters to force their gates), and danced out gaily.
Willet, after the incursion of the rioters into his bar at Chigwell.