ripple mark


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Related to ripple mark: Cross bedding

ripple mark

n
(Physical Geography) one of a series of small wavy ridges of sand formed by waves on a beach, by a current in a sandy riverbed, or by wind on land: sometimes found fossilized on bedding planes of sedimentary rock

rip′ple mark`


n.
1. one of the wavy lines or ridges produced, esp. on sand, by the action of waves, wind, or the like.
2. one of such forms preserved in sandstone or siltstone.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ripple mark - one of a series of small ridges produced in sand by water currents or by wind
ridge - a long narrow natural elevation or striation
References in periodicals archive ?
Above the basal conglomerate of the Tapeats, the rest of the formation is composed of sand about 200 feet thick, with bedding containing sedimentary structures typical of tidal flat, beach, and shallow-shore environments that include ripple marks, mud cracks, and raindrop prints (Fig.
Ripple marks on the sandstone indicate the creature was struggling to swim against a current.
Ripple marks left by the sea can still be seen in the sandstone on the summit of Pen y Fan.
Most of us admit that our very best pictures of rocks were achieved by surreptitiously pointing our cameras over his shoulder when he had carefully selected the right angle to catch the shadows on a mountain range or on a row of ripple marks.
Fossilised ripple marks in sand formed by water currents are preserved at Black Pastures Quarry, near Chollerford, where even the casts created by burrowing worms 325 million years ago can be seen.
At the bottom of the steps leading up to the jubilee tower at Castle Hill look for the ripple marks still visible on the paving stones.
The pattern of ripple marks and other features locked in southwestern Utah's sandstone indicates that the mineral grains had been blown in from those directions.
Schlieren exhibit layering similar to cross-bedding and preserve ripple marks along their base.
Key features of these specimens include flaked surfaces running in two or more directions and ripple marks, cracks and protrusions clearly resulting from the impact required to detach flakes from stone.