risedronate


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ri·sed·ro·nate

 (rĭ-sĕd′rə-nāt′)
n.
A bisphosphonate drug, C7H11NO7P2, that inhibits bone resorption and is used in the form of its sodium salt to treat and prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

[Perhaps (py)ri(dine) + -se-, origin unknown + (hy)dr(oxy) + (bisphosph)onate.]
Translations

risedronate, risedronate sodium

(USAN), risedronic acid (INN) n risedronato, risedronato sódico, ácido risedrónico (INN)
References in periodicals archive ?
5 mg of risedronate sodium to be taken orally once a week on awakening with an adequate amount of water (about 180 mL).
Materials and Methods: Investigators identified a continuously benefit-eligible cohort of women from a large, geographically diverse, national managed care plan who were newly diagnosed and treated for osteoporosis with alendronate, risedronate, or raloxifene.
In this issue of Clinical Chemistry, Valimaki and Tahtela (11) report the results of direct comparison of 2 independent markers of bone remodeling and comparison of the utility of these 2 markers for monitoring 2 bisphosphonates, risedronate and alendronate, which are widely used for treatment of osteoporosis.
Risedronate is another bisphosphonate that looks good on paper.
Recent studies have shown that the drug risedronate is highly effective in preventing hip fractures in people with osteoporosis.
The Food and Drug Administration has approved five medications to treat or prevent osteoporosis: estrogen replacement therapy, alendronate (Fosamax), raloxifene (Evista), risedronate (Actonel), and calcitonin (Calcimar).
Alternatively, women and possibly men might benefit from drugs such as alendronate and risedronate, which also have been shown to reduce fracture risk in some women with osteoporosis.
Data from a McMaster University, Toronto, Ontario, endoscopy study published recently in Gastroenterology and presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) showed that risedronate sodium (Actonel) reduced the incidence of gastric ulcers in healthy, postmenopausal women relative to another osteoporosis therapy, alendronate sodium.
In this report, we analyze uptake of these drugs over the next several years and the implications for other drugs in the Japanese market, such as alendronate (Merck/Teijin's Fosamax/Bonalon, generics) and risedronate (Sanofi/Warner Chilcott/Eisai's Actonel/Atelvia, Takeda's Benet, generics).
teriparatide[rDNA origin] injection) and risedronate on back pain in postmenopausal women with osteoporotic vertebral fractures.
The FDA has approved alendronate, zoledronic acid (Reclast), and risedronate (Actonel) for treatment of GIOP.
A meta-analysis study has demonstrated the efficacy of anti-resorptive agents: raloxifene and etidronate have been shown to reduce the incidence of vertebral fractures, and alendronate and risedronate have been shown to reduce the incidence of both vertebral and hip fractures.