ritonavir


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ri·ton·a·vir

 (rĭ-tŏn′ə-vîr)
n.
A protease-inhibiting drug usually used in combination with other drugs to suppress the replication of HIV.

[rito-, of unknown origin + -navir, protease inhibitor suff. (from saquinavir).]

ritonavir

(raɪˈtɒnəˌvɪə)
n
(Medicine) a type of anti-viral drug used to treat HIV infection and AIDS
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ritonavir - a protease inhibitor (trade name Norvir) used in treating HIV
protease inhibitor, PI - an antiviral drug used against HIV; interrupts HIV replication by binding and blocking HIV protease; often used in combination with other drugs
Translations

ritonavir

n ritonavir m
References in periodicals archive ?
h/mL), the only significant difference was found in ritonavir pretreated group (group 3).
Earlier this month the FDA gave the green light to Lannett's abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) for lopinavir and ritonavir oral solution USP, 80 mg/20 mg per ml, a therapeutic equivalent to Abb Vie Inc.
The so-called 3D regimen consists of the NS5A inhibitor ombitasvir co-formulated in once-daily fixed-dose fashion with the NS3/4A protease inhibitor paritaprevir boosted with ritonavir, along with twice-daily dasabuvir, a nonnucleoside NS5B RNA polymerase inhibitor.
According to the company, VIEKIRA XR is a once-daily, extended-release co-formulation of the active ingredients in VIEKIRA PAK (ombitasvir, paritaprevir and ritonavir tablets; dasabuvir tablets) and is for the treatment of patients with chronic genotype 1 (GT1) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with compensated cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A).
The incidence of dyslipidemia is significantly higher in patients treated with antiretroviral regimens containing ritonavir compared to other regimens not containing ritonavir.
A commonly prescribed antiretroviral drug for treating and preventing HIV infection, Ritonavir, has undesirable side effects and oral-delivery issues.
This study demonstrated that a large proportion of the original cohort of children and adolescents commenced on ART including lopinavir/ ritonavir in 2001 remained on such therapy with their underlying HIV disease well controlled through the end of 2010.
For 45 mother/infant pairs, the mothers' antiretroviral regimens included a protease inhibitor, lopinavir, boosted by ritonavir, another antiretroviral medication.
In order to overcome the effect of rifampicin on boosted lopinavir or saquinavir, the dose of ritonavir can be increased (400 mg of ritonavir 12-hourly in combination with 400 mg of lopinavir or saquinavir 12-hourly in adults).
4 mg/264 mg with nevirapine 400 mg, followed by indinavir 1 600 mg with ritonavir 800 mg, ritonavir 600 mg with efavirenz 600 mg, and saquinavir 800 mg with efavirenz 800 mg, for both GPs and SPs.
The results confirmed that when compared to un-boosted danoprevir, ritonavir boosting safely provides potent antiviral effects and offers attractive dosing convenience advantages and increased safety margin.