ritualism


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rit·u·al·ism

 (rĭch′o͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The practice or observance of religious ritual.
2. Insistence on or adherence to ritual.

ritualism

(ˈrɪtjʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
4. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
ˈritualist n

rit•u•al•ism

(ˈrɪtʃ u əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. adherence to ritual.
2. excessive fondness for ritual.
[1835–45]
rit′u•al•ist, n.
rit`u•al•is′tic, adj.
rit`u•al•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

ritualism

ceremonialism. — ritualist, n.ritualistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ritualism - the study of religious or magical rites and ceremonies
cultural anthropology, social anthropology - the branch of anthropology that deals with human culture and society
2.ritualism - exaggerated emphasis on the importance of rites or ritualistic forms in worship
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations

ritualism

[ˈrɪtjʊəlɪzəm] Nritualismo m

ritualism

nRitualismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
He challenged Catholicism to change from a religion of coercion to a religion of freedom, from fear to love, from legalism to personalism, from triumphalism to humanism, from authoritarianism to democracy, from ritualism to service, from dogmatism to openness, and from brutal discipline to compassion and mercy.
Professor Chow attempts to understand ritualism in both its "intellectualist" and its "functionalist" senses, that is, as the statement of a world view and as socially integrative group performance.
In his study of Eastwood's work and career, Smith follows a chronological pattern taking us from the spaghetti-western period of ritualism on the screen through all of the phases, forms, and genres of his films over the years.
Ronald Horton's 1982 British Literature for Christian Schools: The Modern Tradition, 1688 to the Present sets the tone when he says the Anglican Church is "dead in ritualism and rationalism and serves mainly a ceremonial function.
Few other sports share the global interest, elaborate showmanship and the popularity of K-1, along with the deep spirituality and ritualism practiced over centuries by millions of martial artists.
It does so by containing narcissistic phenomena in what they call the "offertorium," a concept they take from Christian ritualism that denotes a reflective space for sacred objects.
Goffman's very first paper is called "Symbols of Class Status," and there you can see the combination of Durkeimian ritualism and the empirical topics of American sociology.
39) Both appear, at least to the mind of a reader uninitiated to the intricacies of ritualism, to characterize Master Kong as a pedantic person--provided, of course, that one accepts the usual ascription.
Take that away, and one has ideologically driven ritualism rather than worship of a God whose glory is seen in the disfigured body on the cross .
However, for White, Wollstonecraft's emphasis on a genuine, spontaneous sensibility that tore through the pious frauds of both religious ritualism and female sentimentality not only consistently animates her thought but also transforms the whole of Godwin's later texts.
Unlike other sects of Buddhism, which condemn ritualism and worldliness, the tantric sect revolves around rituals and magical traditions.
Scholars from Owen Chadwick to John Reed have tended to focus on the devotionalism and ritualism of the Tractarians and their Anglo-Catholic progeny.